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COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT. 



THE NEW ENGLAND 



COOK BOOK 



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MARY GOOLD 



NEWPORT, R. I. 

THE MILNE PRINTERY 

1909 



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¥? 



COPYEIGHT, 1909 

BY 

M. G. BUCKLEY 



ICI.A251343 



Table of Contents. 





PAGE 


Bread, etc. .... 


8 


Breakfast Dishes 


10 


Beverages .... 


25 


Soups .... 


28 


Chowders .... 


37 


Meats, etc. .... 


40 


Poultry and Game 


49 


Fish . . . 


55 


Sauces ..... 


62 


Croquettes .... 


68 


Eggs . .... 


75 


Vegetables .... 


79 


Omelets .... 


75 


Salad Dressing 


93 


Salads ..... 


95 


Puddings .... 


103 


Ice Cream .... 


117 


Jellies ..... 


119 


Sweet Sauces .... 


124 


Candy .... 


127 


Pies ..... 


130 


Cake .... 


138 


Ginger-Bread .... 


150 


Cookies .... 


154 


Preserving, etc. 


159 


Pickling .... 


162 


Invalid Cookery 


166 



PREFACE 



In compiling this cook book no attempt has been made 
to compete with the larger ones, as that would be well-nigh 
impossible, but merely to give some cherished recipes of 
old housewives from manuscript books which have been 
transmitted to them through generations. They have 
been thoroughly tried and proved successful and have 
been found to give the most satisfactory results at the 
least possible cost. The greater number have been 
obtained from women of New England ; quite a number 
were either contributed or dictated by Southern colored 
cooks of high reputation in the art and who seem to have 
a natural aptitude for that work; whilst a very few were 
given by people from foreign countries. The most of 
these recipes are designed for families who live well, but 
moderately, and who find it necessary to live in a plain 
and economical way. A very few are arranged for 
elaborate occasions. If these recipes are carefully and 
fairly tried, I feel that few, if any, will cause disappoint- 
ment, and that a new interest may be awakened in old- 
fashioned dishes, now almost extinct. 

M. G. 



Table of Measures 



2 cupfuls of granulated sugar make I pound. 

2.Y2. cupfuls of powdered sugar make I pound. 

2 1-3 cupfuls of brown sugar make 1 pound. 

4 cupfuls of flour make 1 pound. 

2 cupfuls of solid butter make 1 pound. 

8 heaping tablespoons make 1 cup. 

12 tablespoons dry material make I cup. 

16 tablespoons of liquid make I cup. 

% teaspoon make 1 saltspoon. 

2 level teaspoons make 1 rounding teaspoon. 

All ingredients used in these recipes are measured 
level, unless otherwise stated. 

Tin measuring cup, holding y 2 pint, is the regulation 
size. 



CHAPTER I. 

Bread, Breakfast Dishes and Beverages 
Hint : Bread must not be moved in the oven until after 
the first quarter, or until it has set or risen. The tempera- 
ture of the water used in making bread must be 98-100 
degrees F. 

MILK BREAD. (Prize recipe.) 
Dissolve Yi magic (dry) yeast cake in I pint of warm 
water, thicken with flour, add 2 tablespoons white sugar 
and 1 teaspoon salt; let this rise over night, or about 10 
hours. Scald 2 teacups of milk; when cool dissolve ^4 
teaspoon soda in the milk, add 1 quart of flour to the 
batter, stirring with a knife ; then add the milk and enough 
more flour to knead, until it will not stick to the fingers. 
Let it rise until light, knead it again, let it rise again, 
divide into 2 loaves, let it rise in the pan and bake 1 hour. 
This may be started about 10 A. M. and the bread made 
about 8 P. M., and let rise over night and bake in the 
morning. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 
One pint of milk, scalded, and cooled, Yz cup of sugar, 
1 teaspoon salt, % yeast cake dissolved in 34 c"P of 
lukewarm water, 4 or 5 cups of fine granulated wheat 
flour or \y 2 cups of white flour and 3^ cups of sifted 
graham flour. Mix in the order given into a dough, a 
little softer than for white bread ; let it rise till light, stir 
it down, pour into well-greased pans or, if stiff enough. 

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into loaves. Let it rise again and bake a little longer 
and in a cooler oven than for white bread. This should 
be mixed in the morning, as when done at night it is liable 
to become sour. 

RUSK. 

Make a dough at night by the rule for Parker House 
rolls. In the morning make half the quantity into bread 
or biscuits; with the remainder add Yz cup of butter, I 
cup of sugar, 2-3 cup of currants, a little cinnamon and 
a little nutmeg, 1 egg well beaten ; mix and beat well 
with the hand; add enough flour to shape easily. Let it 
rise in the bowl, shape into small rounds, put them in a 
shallow cake pan, so to have them rise high, have a little 
sugar and milk in a cup dissolved; rub over the top of 
the biscuits and sprinkle with sugar. Bake at once in a 
moderate oven. 

STICK DOUGH. 

One cup of milk, scalded. Add 1-3 cup of butter, 2 
tablespoons of sugar, y 2 teaspoon salt. When lukewarm 
add the white of 1 egg well beaten and a quarter of a 
yeast cake dissolved in 3 tablespoons of lukewarm water. 
Then add about 4 cups of flour and knead about 10 
minutes. Let them rise in a cool place. If desired per- 
fectly dry, bake in a slow oven, but if liked soft inside, 
bake in an oven as hot as for bread. Roll into round balls, 
then roll long with no flour on the board. 
WATER BREAD. 

One table-spoon lard or drippings, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 



New England Cook Book 

tablespoons sugar, 2 cups boiling water, about 6 or 7 
cups of flour. Put the sugar, salt, lard in the mixing 
bowl, add 2 cups of boiling water to dissolve them. 
When cool add y 2 yeast cake dissolved in y 2 cup of 
lukewarm water and stir in the flour, adding it gradually 
after 5 cups are used, so that it will not be stiff; use just 
enough to knead, until smooth and elastic. Cover, let it 
rise over night, cut it down, divide into four parts, shape 
into loaves. Let it rise again in the pans. Bake about 
1 hour. 

DOUGH CAKES. 
Take a piece of bread dough, after it has risen and 
ready to be put into the pans, flour a board, roll out about 
Y* inch thick, cut in squares. Have a frying pan, about 
1-3 full boiling fat, put in your cakes and fry until brown, 
then turn and fry the other side, remove to griddle with- 
out being greased, put in oven, cover, and let them cook 
slowly for 10 minutes, or until well puffed up. Drain on 
brown paper, and serve hot. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 
Pour 1 pint of scalded milk on 2 tablespoons each of 
butter and sugar and 1 teaspoon of salt; when lukewarm 
add y 2 cup of yeast, if mixed in the morning and % if 
mixed at night. Stir in 3 cups of flour and beat well. 
Let it rise over night or, if mixed in the day, about 3 
hours ; then add flour till stiff enough to knead ; knead 

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20 minutes. Let it rise until double its size. Shape into 
rolls, and let them rise in the pans. 

RAISED BISCUITS. 

One quart of bread flour, 1 large tablespoon of butter, 
or lard, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 teaspoon of salt, y 2 cup of 
yeast or x / 2 yeast cake dissolved in y 2 cup of lukewarm 
water, a bowlful of milk and water or enough to make a 
stiff batter. Cover, let rise over night; in the morning, 
roll out on a floured board, cut into rounds, spread with 
softened butter, put two together, having the buttered 
sides in the middle, and bake 15 or 20 minutes. 

Hints: Gem pans should be heated through, then but- 
tered and placed on back of the range and batter put in, 
giving a chance to rise, before putting in the oven. 

Any muffins or gems may be baked in muffin rings, 
placed on a griddle or baking pan, and cooked a little on 
top of stove, then finish baking in the oven. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 
Sift 1^2 cups of graham flour, y 2 cup of white flour, 
% cup of sugar, y 2 teaspoon salt, 4 teaspoons baking 
powder together. Beat 1 egg, add 1 cup of milk, and stir 
quickly into the dry ingredients. Beat thoroughly and 
add 1 tablespoon melted butter. Put in hot gem pans 
and fill to the top. Bake 25 minutes. 

RICE MUFFINS. 
Mix 2 cups of boiled rice with 2 cups of sweet milk, 
beat well, add the yolks of 3 eggs, well beaten. In 

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another bowl sift 4 cups of flour with 2 rounding tea- 
spoons of cream of tartar and 1 level teaspoon of soda, 1 
teaspoon of salt, 2 tablespoons of sugar. Stir the first 
mixture into the dry ingredients and beat well, add % 
cup of melted butter and the beaten whites and bake in 
greased muffin tins, in a hot oven, for 15 or 20 minutes. 
If baking powder is used, use 4 rounding teaspoonfuls. 
This recipe can be halved, and baked as a cake. 

RICE MUFFINS. (No. 2.) 
One cup of flour, 1 cup of warmed boiled rice, a pinch 
of salt, 2 rounding teaspoons of baking powder, 2 table- 
spoons of sugar, 2 eggs, y^ cup of butter and lard, melted. 
Mix flour, salt, sugar and baking powder together. Beat 
the egg, and add ^2 cup of milk. Stir gradually into the 
flour. When it is a smooth, light paste, add the melted 
lard and rice. If not thin enough, add a little more 
milk. Beat thoroughly. Bake about y 2 hour. This 
recipe can be used for waffles. 

FRIED RYE MUFFINS. 
Three-quarters cup of rye meal, 24 CU P °f flour, 4 tea- 
spoons of baking powder, 1 tablespoon sugar, */£ teaspoon 
salt, 1 egg, well beaten, y 2 cup of sweet milk. Mix in 
the order given, beat well and drop from a small table- 
spoon into hot fat. Cook until the muffins will not stick 
when tried with a fork. These may be baked by adding 
2 tablespoons of melted butter. 

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New England Cook Book 



MEAL MUFFINS. 

One teacup of white meal, scald it thoroughly, thin 
with milk, add 2 beaten eggs, 2 heaping tablespoons of 
flour and 2 heaping teaspoons of baking powder, mixed 
together, a little sugar, pinch of salt and a small piece of 
butter. Bake in gem pans. 

CORN MEAL PUFFS. 
Two cups of sifted corn meal, i teaspoon of salt, and I 
teaspoon of sugar, sift again, add I tablespoon of drip- 
pings, pour over this a pint of boiling milk, ]/* teaspoon 
of saleratus (dissolved in a little warm milk). When 
the dough is sufficiently cooled, add 1 large beaten egg, 
mix well, and if the dough is not soft enough add a little 
more milk. Bake in gem pans in a hot oven. 

SALLY LUNNS. (Southern recipe.) 

Two eggs, 2 tea-cups of cream, 2 cups of granulated 
sugar, 1 teaspoon of cream tartar, 1 pint of flour, }4 pound 
of butter, 1 teaspoon mace. Put cream and butter into a 
heated bowl, to be warmed together, when melted pour 
into the well-beaten eggs and sugar; sift the flour, mace 
and cream of tartar, mixed together, into it gradually. 
Beat thoroughly for 3 or 4 minutes. Dissolve l /z tea- 
spoon soda in a little warm water and mix well. Have 
the pans buttered, then stir the soda in quickly to the 
mixture, put into the oven immediately, before the effer- 
vescence ceases. Bake in a hot oven about 20 minutes. 

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New England Cook Book 



BREAKFAST GEMS. 
Mix and sift together I cup of pastry flour, y 2 tea- 
spoon of salt and ^ of a cup of sugar. Beat the yolks 
of 2 eggs and add I cup of rich milk; stir into the dry 
ingredients. Beat the whites very stiff and cut in. Bake 
in hot buttered gem pans 20 minutes. 

OLD FASHIONED JOHNNY CAKES. 

One quart of sifted Indian corn meal, 1 scant tea- 
spoon of salt and 1 teaspoon of sugar. Sift the dry 
ingredients together, melt 1 tablespoon of butter in 1 
quart of boiling water and pour over the meal. If the 
mixture is not soft enough, add a little more boiling 
water. Make and shape like fish cakes. Place on a 
well-greased frying pan, bake till a light brown, turn and 
bake the other side till well browned. Remove from fire 
and place in the oven for 10 minutes, to puff up, and 
serve very hot. 

RHODE ISLAND JOHNNY CAKE. 

Take Y\ cup meal, 1 teaspoon of salt and scald thor- 
oughly with boiling water. Thin with hot milk so that 
it will drop easily from spoon on to a hot well-greased 
frying pan. Cook over a moderate fire, and when brown 
on one side, turn and brown the other. (Add more 
grease if necessary.) 

TO STEAM BREAD. 

Put over the fire a large saucepan of boiling water, 
and place over it a steamer. Fill steamer with stale 

13 



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bread or biscuits. Spread over the bread a perfectly 
clean cloth and steam 15 or 20 minutes. Serve piping hot. 

POP OVERS. 

Sift 1 cupful of flour and ]/\ teaspoon of salt together, 
add 1 cup of milk slowly and beat with an egg beater ; 
when smooth, add 1 beaten egg. Cook in hot buttered 
(iron) gem pans or earthen cups, in a moderately hot 
oven for half an hour, or until they are crisp and dry. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 
Coffee cup of sour milk, level teaspoon of soda, 2 
tablespoons of sugar, 3 tablespoons meited lard, 1 egg, 
graham flour enough for a batter. Yellow corn meal 
may be used instead of graham. Bake in a hot oven for 
20 minutes. 

MUFFINS. 
One pint of flour, 4 teaspoons baking powder, ]/ 2 tea- 
spoon salt, 2 eggs, y 2 cup of milk, % cup of melted 
butter. Sift the flour, the baking powder and salt together 
three times. Beat the yolks of the eggs, add the milk and 
pour over the dry ingredients. Beat well, then add 
melted butter, and lastly cut in the whites beaten stiff. 
Bake in hot gem pans about 25 minutes. 

WAFFLES. 
Beat the yolks of 4 eggs, add 1 quart of milk, l / 2 tea- 
spoon of salt, yi of a pound of melted butter, and flour 
enough to make a batter not very thick. Cut in the 

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whites, beaten stiff. Heat and butter the irons well, fill 
and bake quickly. Serve with butter or maple syrup. 

RICE WAFFLES. 
One cup of rice cooked very soft and mashed fine, Y\ 
of a pound of butter, y 2 teaspoon of salt, the beaten yolks 
and whites of 4 eggs, 1 tablespoon of sugar and a little 
nutmeg. Flour enough to make a batter. Bake as for 
waffles. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

Measure and sift 1 cupful each of rye meal, corn meal 
and graham flour, y 2 teaspoon salt, and 1 heaping tea- 
spoon of soda mashed fine, add Y cup of molasses and 
2 cups of very thick sour milk. Beat well, pour into but- 
tered mould and steam 3^2 hours, having the water in 
the kettle boiling, when the brown bread mould is put 
in, and have enough water to come one-half way up the 
side of the mould. Add boiling water when it is neces- 
sary to replenish. Remove cover and place in the oven 
for 10 minutes. If sweet milk be used, the teaspoon of 
soda should only be slightly rounding. 

GERMAN TOAST. 
Beat 1 egg slightly in a pudding dish, add I saltspoon 
salt, 1 tablespoon sugar and 1 cup of milk. Have ready 
4 or 5 slices of stale bread, and soak each slice in this 
mixture until soft. Have a griddle hot and well but- 
tered. Brown them on one side, turn and place a piece 
of butter on the top of the other side and brown. To be 

15 



New England Cook Book 



eaten hot, with butter or sugar, mixed with cinnamon. 
This is a very nice and convenient way of using up stale 
bread. 

MILK TOAST. 
One pint of milk scalded, 4 tablespoons flour, 3 table- 
spoons of butter, x / 2 teaspoon salt, 6 slices of toast. Scald 
the milk, put the butter in a saucepan, when melted, add 
the flour, salt and pepper mixed together, stir well, add 
the milk gradually, stirring well. Moisten each slice with 
boiling water and put the toast in a hot deep dish; then 
pour over the thickened milk. Keep the dish over hot 
water until ready to serve. 

MELISSA'S CORN CAKES. 
I quart of sifted white Indian meal, a saltspoon of 
salt. Mix the two ingredients together and sift again, 
then pour on a pint of boiling milk or enough to make a 
soft dough, stir it vigorously and add % of a pound of 
butter; let it cool. Beat 4 eggs lightly, and when the 
dough is sufficiently cooled, turn them gradually into the 
mixture. Pour into well-greased gem pans and bake 
well in a moderate oven for 40 or 45 minutes. Serve 
them very hot with butter or maple sugar. 

SOUR MILK CORN CAKE. 

I cup of flour, l / 2 cup of corn meal, l / 2 teaspoon salt, 

y 2 teaspoon of soda (mashed), 1 cup of sour milk, 1 

egg and 2 tablespoons of drippings. Sift and mix the 

dry ingredients together. Beat the egg very light and add 

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New England Cook Book 



the milk, pour into the dry ingredients and beat well, 
lastly add the drippings, melted. Beat well, bake in a 
shallow pan, about 25 minutes, in a hot oven. 

CORN CAKE. 

One pint of milk, corn meal enough to make it the 
consistency of sponge cake, 1 egg, 2 teaspoons of baking 
powder, 1 saltspoon of salt, 1 tablespoon of butter, melt- 
ed. Mix in the order given and beat thoroughly. Bake 
in a hot oven for 25 minutes. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUITS. 

Sift 1 quart of flour, 1 teaspoon of salt and 2 teaspoons 
of sugar, 4 teaspoons of baking powder together. Stir 
and rub in 6 tablespoons of butter. Add milk enough to 
make a soft dough (about 1 pint). When stiff enough 
to handle, roll out in a sheet Yz inch thick. Cut in 
rounds. Place slightly apart on greased pans, brush the 
tops with milk, and bake in a quick oven for 10 or 12 
minutes. 

CORN BREAD. (No. 2.) 
Sift 1 cup of flour, x /z cup of sugar, 1 saltspoon salt, 3 
rounding teaspoons of baking powder. Beat 3 eggs sepa- 
rately and add 1 quart of milk to the beaten yolks, and 
stir into the dry mixture. Thicken with Indian meal to 
make a batter and beat well. Cut in beaten whites, add 
4 tablespoons of melted butter. Bake in flat pan about 
25 minutes. 

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New England Cook Book 



RAISED SALLY LUNN. 

One quart of flour, i teaspoon of salt, 2 tablespoons 
sugar, ^2 cup of yeast, 3 eggs, yolk and whites beaten 
separately, and milk enough to make a drop batter. If 
intended for tea, allow 6 hours to rise, then add 2 table- 
spoons butter, melted. When well mixed, fill muffin pan 
two-thirds full. Let them rise about 20 minutes, and 
bake in a hot oven about 20 minutes. If intended for 
breakfast, make a batter of salt, sugar, flour, yeast and 
milk and keep in a cool place. In the morning add the 
eggs. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

Mix together 2 cups of sifted corn meal, 1 teaspoon 
sugar, 2 teaspoons baking powder and 1 teaspoon salt. 
Scald with 1 quart of boiling milk, and when slightly 
cool add the yolks and whites of 4 eggs, beaten separately, 
1 tablespoon butter, melted. Bake in buttered gem pans, 
heated, 25 minutes. 

PUFFS. 
Three coffee cups of flour, 1 teaspoon of soda (mashed 
fine), 2 rounding teaspoons cream tartar, butter size of 
an egg, 1 egg well beaten, 1 cup of milk. Bake like 
muffins in a hot oven. 

HOMINY CAKE. 
One-half cup of warm boiled hominy, 1 cup of milk, 
1 cup of flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, y 2 teaspoon 
of salt, 2 tablespoons of butter, 2 teaspoons sugar and 2 

18 



New England Cook Book 



eggs. Sift and mix all the dry ingredients together. Mix 
the butter into the hominy, pour milk into the beaten 
eggs and add to the hominy. Then add the dry ingre- 
dients and beat well. If not stiff enough for a drop bat- 
ter, add a little more flour. Pour batter into a shallow 
pan and bake y 2 hour, or it may be baked in muffin 
pans instead. Part flour and corn meal may be used 
instead of all flour, to give variety. 

SPIDER CORN CAKE. 

Mix and sift together I 1-3 cups of Indian corn meal, 
1-3 cup of white flour, 2 teaspoons of baking powder, 2 
tablespoons of sugar, 1 teaspoon salt. Beat 2 eggs very 
light, add 1 pint of sweet milk ; stir this into the dry mix- 
ture. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a spider or shallow 
round pan, and pour the mixture into it, then pour over 
1 cup of sweet miilk, but do not stir. Bake about 30 
minutes, in a hot oven. When done it should have a 
streak of custard through it, and must be cut and served 
on hot plates. 

NEVER FAIL CORN CAKE. 

Three-quarters of a cup of corn meal, 1% cups of 
flour, 2 heaping teaspoons baking powder, 2 heaping table- 
spoons sugar, y 2 teaspoon salt, 1 generous cup of milk, 
1 large egg, well beaten, 2 tablespoons melted butter. Sift 
dry ingredients together twice, mix thoroughly, add the 
milk to the beaten egg, and pour on slowly, then add 
melted butter. Beat well, and bake in shallow pan, in 

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a hot oven, at least 25 minutes. By using 4 tablespoons 
of butter, the egg may be omitted, and will be found to 
be very good. 

HOE CAKE. 

Put 1 cup of corn meal, 1 teaspoon of salt, into a gran- 
ite dish. Scald with boiling water; pour on enough to 
make it stiff, but thoroughly wet. Add 1 large table- 
spoon butter and let the mixture cook on top of stove for 
10 minutes, stirring to prevent burning. Butter a pan 
and spread mush on it, 1 inch thick. Dot over with small 
pieces of butter, and bake in a moderately hot oven from 
45 minutes to 1 hour. The crust should be brown and 
crisp, and the inside soft and white. 

SOUTHERN CORN CAKE. 
Sift and mix together 1 pint of corn meal, 1 teaspoon 
soda, 1 teaspoon of salt, 2 teaspoons sugar. Stir in 2 
cups of sour milk, 1 tablespoon of butter, melted, beat 2 
eggs, yolks and whites separately, and add to the mix- 
ture. Beat thoroughly and bake in shallow pans, in a 
very hot oven, for 30 minutes. 

OATMEAL CAKE. 

One-half cup of corn meal, Yz cup of cooked oatmeal, 
1 cup of flour, 5 teaspoons of baking powder, *^ tea- 
spoon of salt, 2 tablespoons of sugar, 1 scant cup of milk, 
1 egg and 2 tablespoons of butter. Mix corn meal, flour, 
salt, sugar and baking powder together ; beat the egg, add 
the milk, and stir into the dry ingredients, then add the 

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hot oatmeal and melted butter. Beat well and bake in a 
shallow pan for 25 minutes. This is delicious. 

ABOUT GRIDDLE CAKE BATTER. 

Hint: If you can drop a spoonful of the batter into 
the bowl containing the batter, and it lies on the sur- 
face, in a smooth heap, and only gradually sinks, you 
have the right consistency. If it lies in a heap, but has 
stiff, ragged edges, it needs more wetting. 

Let the batter stand for 5 minutes before frying cakes. 

Muffins and griddle cakes should be made light, by 
using butter or cream instead of a number of eggs, which 
toughen it instead. 

Sour milk is best for griddle cakes. 

Pastry flour should be used with baking powder ; bread 
flour in all recipes where yeast is used. 

The griddle must be merely greased by rubbing a piece 
of salt pork lightly over it when hot, then pour the batter 
on at once. 

BREAD GRIDDLE CAKES. (No. 2.) 

One pint of stale bread crumbs, 1 pint of scalded milk, 

1 heaping tablespoon butter. Pour the hot milk over the 
crumbs, add the butter and soak over night or until 
crumbs are soft. Rub through a coarse strainer, and add 

2 eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, and 1 cup of 
flour in which Yz teaspoon salt and 4 teaspoons of baking 
powder have been sifted, and cold milk to thin. Bake 
slowly on a hot griddle. Serve with sugar and butter. 

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New England Cook Book 



BREAD GRIDDLE CAKES. 

One coffee cup of bread crumbs, 4 cups of flour, 2^2 
heaping teaspoons baking powder, 3 eggs, beaten sepa- 
rately, and sweet milk to make a thin batter. These 
should not be made with sour milk and soda. 

RICE OR HOMINY GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Mix together 1 cup of hot boiled rice, 1 cup of sweet 
milk, y 2 teaspoon of salt ; add the beaten yolks of 2 eggs 
and 2 tablespoons of melted butter, then add %. cup of 
corn meal and about ^ of a cup of pastry flour mixed 
and sifted with 2 teaspoons of baking powder. Lastly 
add the whites beaten stiff. Fry on a hot buttered grid- 
dle. Cold boiled rice may be used, but must be warmed 
in butter. Pack solidly. 

SOUR MILK GRIDDLE CAKES. 

One pint of lobbered milk, 1 egg, l / 2 teaspoon of salt, 

1 to i]/ 2 teaspoons of bi-carbonate of soda, tablespoon 
of melted butter and flour enough to make a stiff batter 
(about 2 l / 2 cups). Fry on a smoking hot griddle. The 
rule is to use enough soda to make the milk sweet. One- 
half cup of corn meal and 2 cups of flour may be used 
instead of all flour. 

GRAHAM GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Sift l / 2 cup of graham flour, 1 cupful of pastry flour, 

2 teaspoons of baking powder, % teaspoon of salt, \ l / 2 
tablespoons of sugar. Mix together and add 1 beaten 
egg, mixed with 1% cups of milk and % cup of melted 

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New England Cook Book 



butter. Fry on a hot buttered griddle and serve at once, 
with syrup. 

INDIAN MEAL GRIDDLE CAKES. 
Sift i cup of meal, i l /i cups of flour, i teaspoon soda 
and i saltspoon of salt together and mix. Beat 2 eggs, 
add 1 pint of sour milk or buttermilk, and add to the first 
mixture. Beat thoroughly for 3 or 4 minutes, then pour 
on 2 tablespoons of melted butter. Bake on a very hot 
griddle to a nice brown. Serve with maple syrup. If 
sweet milk be used, use 3 teaspoons of baking powder. 

OATMEAL GRIDDLE CAKES. 
Sift and mix 1 cup of flour, y 2 cup of corn meal, 2 
slightly rounding teaspoons of baking powder, Yz tea- 
spoon of salt, 2 tablespoons of sugar together; beat 1 
egg, add ]/ 2 cup of milk, and add to the dry ingredients, 
then mix in 3^ cup of hot cooked oatmeal and 2 table- 
spoons of butter (melted). Add enough more milk to 
make a thin batter. Bake on a hot greased griddle ; turn 
when full of bubbles and bake on the other side until 
brown. 

PUMPKIN GRIDDLE CAKES. 
One cup of steamed and sifted pumpkin, 1 cup of 
milk, % cup of sugar, pinch of salt, 1 egg beaten, 1 heap- 
ing cup of flour, mixed and sifted, with 1 rounding tea- 
spoon of baking powder, and % cup of melted butter. 
If cold pumpkin be used, heat in a saucepan, adding 2 
tablespoons of water. 

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New England Cook Book 



OLD FASHIONED PAN CAKES. 
Scald i cup of Indian meal and I cup of rye meal thor- 
oughly with boiling water, add a pinch of salt, 2 table- 
spoons of butter, the beaten yolks of 2 eggs and y 2 cup 
of sour milk. Then add 1 cup of flour mixed with 1 salt- 
spoon of saleratus, and beat well ; lastly the beaten whites 
and enough more milk to make a thin batter. Fry on a 
hot griddle and serve at once, with butter or syrup. 

SWEET PAN CAKES. 
Sift and mix together i l / 2 cups of flour, 2 teaspoons 
of baking powder. Beat the yolks and whites of 4 eggs, 
separately. Add 1 pint of milk to the yolks, a pinch of 
salt, and 2 tablespoons of powdered sugar. Pour a little 
of this on the dry mixture, and stir to a smooth paste. 
Add the remainder of the milk and beat well ; then add 2 
tablespoons of melted butter. If needed, add more flour 
to make a moderately thin batter. Lastly add the beaten 
whites. Heat and butter a small griddle, and butter each 
as it comes from the fire. Place four in a pile, spread 
jelly over each one, roll up, and sprinkle with powdered 
sugar. 

PANCAKES. (No. 2). 
Take 1 pint of sifted flour, 2 slightly rounding tea- 
spoons baking powder, l / 2 teaspoon salt. Sift three times 
and mix well. Add milk enough to make a stiff batter 
(about 1 cup), then add 1 teaspoon melted butter, or 1 
tablespoon of cream. Beat vigorously. Lastly, the 

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white of i beaten egg. Fry on a hot griddle and serve 
at once. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 
Dissolve Yz yeast cake in lukewarm water, sift in 2-3 
of a cup of corn meal, 2 heaping cups of buckwheat flour 
and a little salt. Mix well ; get batter thin enough to 
pour. Let rise over night, in the morning stir well, add I 
tablespoon molasses, ]/\ teaspoon soda dissolved in %. 
cup of lukewarm water, and cook as griddle cakes. Save 
about ]/ 2 cup of the mixture in a pitcher, fill with luke- 
warm water, and turn off the water every day, using the 
Yi cup to raise the batter instead of a fresh cake. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. (No. 2.) 
Pour 1 cup of boiling water on 2 heaping tablespoons 
of corn meal, add 1 saltspoon of salt, mix well, and when 
lukewarm add 1 yeast cake dissolved in lukewarm water 
and 1 pint of buckwheat flour. Beat vigirously. Let 
rise over night ; in the morning stir down and beat again. 
When risen add 2 tablespoons of molasses and % tea- 
spoon soda. Beat again and fry. Serve with maple 
syrup. Reserve l /> cup of the batter to raise another 
mixing instead of using yeast cake. 

TEA. 

The water should be freshly boiled that is to be used 

in making tea. Scald and heat the teapot and put in the 

tea, allowing 1 teaspoon for each cup and 1 extra one, 

let stand on back of range for a few minutes ; then pour 

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on boiling water, cover closely and place it where it will 
keep hot, but not boil, for 5 minutes. Serve at once. 

RUSSIAN TEA. 
Put the tea into a fine strainer ; pour y 2 a cup of boil- 
ing water over it to cleanse the grounds; then turn into 
a teapot which has been scalded, and pour on freshly 
boiling water, in the proportion of I cup of water for 
each tablespoon of tea. Keep hot for 5 minutes. A 
slice of lemon and 1 preserved strawberry is allowed for 
each cup. Sugar may be added if liked, but never milk. 
Serve hot or cold. 

CHOCOLATE. 

Take an ounce of chocolate for each cup. Melt over 
boiling water, pour on 1 cup of sweet milk, scalded ; add 
sugar to taste and set over boiling water for 5 minutes. 
If a saucepan be used, place where the fire is not too hot 
and stir while it simmers slowly for 5 minutes. The 
chocolate may first be grated and dissolved in cold milk, 
until smooth, if preferred. Take egg beater and whip 
the mixture until it is a creamy smoothness. Whip some 
cream and pile on top of the chocolate in each cup. 

COFFEE. 

Scald a granite or agate coffee pot. Mix 1 cup of 
coffee, 1 egg, cold water to moisten. Add 6 cups of boil- 
ing water and boil 5 minutes ; add 1 cup of cold water 
and place where it will keep hot, but not boil. Serve 
with cream or hot milk. 

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New England Cook Book 



COFFEE. (No. 2.) 

Scald the coffee pot and put in $4 cup of coffee and 6 
cups of cold water and I teaspoon of sugar. Stir and 
cover closely, putting a stopper in the spout ; let stand 
over night, about 12 hours. In the morning place over 
the fire, and when it comes to a boil it is ready for use. 
Do not let it boil longer, as that weakens the coffee. 
Serve with hot milk. The sugar may be omitted if 
desired. 

FILTERED COFFEE. 

Put 1 cup of coffee in the top of a French coffee pot. 
Pour on 4 cups of boiling water; keep the coffee pot 
where it will keep hot, but not boil. When all the water 
has been used, pour it through again. Serve it with hot 
milk and cream and loaf sugar. 
COCOA. 

Scald 1 pint of milk; mix 2 tablespoons of cocoa, 2 
tablespoons sugar, a dash of salt and 1 cup of boiling 
water; stir until smooth, then boil 5 or 10 minutes. Add 
scalded milk, beat well with an egg beater and serve at 
once, otherwise the scum will form on the top. 



27 



CHAPTER II. 

Soups and Chowders 

SOUP STOCK. 

Six pounds of lean beef, from the lower part of round, 
wind with twine, to keep from falling to pieces, and 4 
quarts of cold water. When the water boils add 2 car- 
rots cut up fine, 2 leeks, 1 onion stuck with 4 cloves and 
1 turnip. The head and neck of a chicken may be added 
if on hand. Boil slowly for 6 hours. Remove from fire 
and strain. Put away in a cool place. When needed, 
skim off the grease and place on fire to boil. Season 
with salt and pepper. A shin bone may be used in place 
of the round. 

BOUILLON. 

Wipe and cut 3 pounds of lean meat and a bone weigh- 
ing about 1 pound and 3 quarts of water, 1 medium-sized 
turnip, 2 medium-sized carrots, 10 or 12 sprigs of parsley, 
1 or 2 celery leaves, 3 large leeks. Scrape the carrot, 
pare the turnip, cut off the heads of the leeks and remove 
decayed leaves, then cut them crosswise ; wash them all 
in 2 or 3 waters. When well washed put in a dish with 
water until needed. Put meat, bone and cold water on 
to boil slowly with 1 teaspoon of salt. When the scum 
begins to rise, skim at once or the bouillon will not be 

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New England Cook Book 



celery, leeks and parsley together, add these to the soup, 
together with the carrot and turnip, and add the leeks 
within 2^2 hours before the end of the cooking, they not 
taking as long as the other vegetables. Simmer 5 hours. 
If liked dark, use 1 teaspoon of Parisian essence or cara- 
mel coloring. When done, strain, remove the fat, if any, 
and season with salt and pepper. Set away when cold to 
a cool place. 

VIRGINIA SOUP. 
One cup of cooked chicken meat, 1 pint of white stock, 

1 cup of hot cream, ^2 cup of cracker crumbs, yolks of 

2 hard-boiled eggs, y 2 teaspoon of salt, x / 2 saltspoon of 
salt, y 2 saltspoon of paprika, and 1 saltspoon of mace or 
nutmeg. Chop the chicken in a tray, add a few drops of 
onion juice and the stock, and put on to boil in a stew- 
pan, season with salt, pepper and mace. Mash the 
yolks of the eggs fine, and mix them with the cracker 
crumbs, which have been soaked until soft in y 2 cup of 
milk, add the hot cream, turn into the soup. Cook 10 
minutes. Strain and serve with croutons. This is like 
a puree. 

LOBSTER BISQUE. 

Remove the meat from 3 lobsters, and cut the tender 
part into small dice. Put the claw meat and any other 
tough parts with the bones of the body into 1 pint of 
cold water and boil 15 minutes, adding more water as it 
boils away. Scald 3 pints of cream, Melt l /i cup of 

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New England Cook Book 



butter, add 6 tablespoons of flour, i teaspoon of mustard, 
clear, and continue doing it every few minutes. When 
the soup begins to boil, put in an onion, in which you 
have stuck 4 cloves ; then tie the green leaves of the 
1 teaspoon of sugar, y 2 teaspoon of salt, 1 tablespoon 
of vinegar, a dash of cayenne pepper, the strained water 
from the bones and the tender meat, and turn into the 
cream, and cook 10 minutes. Serve at once. The coral 
may be dried in the oven and rubbed through a strainer 
and enough added to the soup to give it a pink color. 

ST. GERMAINE SOUP. 
Put 1 can of peas or 1 quart of fresh in a stew-pan, 
cover with water, a bit of bay leaf, 1 sprig of parsley, 
1 saltspoon of nutmeg, y 2 teaspoon sugar, y 2 teaspoon 
of salt, ]/ 2 saltspoon of pepper, y 2 onion, cooked in 1 
tablespoon of butter. Add to the soup and simmer 45 
minutes. Stir in 1 pint of white stock, the yolk of I tgg, 
1 teaspoon of salt, y 2 saltspoon pepper and y saltspoon 
of nutmeg. Press through a sieve and return to the fire 
and add 2 tablespoons of butter and 2 tablespoons of 
corn-starch, cooked together ; let it come to the boiling 
point and add 1 cup of hot cream or milk. Serve with 
toasted crackers. 

CREAM OF CHESTNUT SOUP. 
Shell and blanch 2 pounds of chestnuts, cook in 1 quart 
of water until tender. Rub through a sieve, add 1 pint 
of chicken stock, put on to simmer for 15 minutes. Melt 



New England Cook Book 



2 tablespoons of butter, add 2 tablespoons of flour, pour 
on 1 pint of hot milk; season with 1 teaspoon of parsley, 
1 teaspoon of celery salt and a dash of paprika or cayenne 
and nutmeg. Stir into the hot soup and cook for 5 
minutes. Add 1 cup of whipped cream and serve hot. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Parboil 8 medium sized potatoes for 5 minutes ; drain. 
Put on to boil again, with 3 cups of boiling water, and 
1 tablespoon of salt, 2 onions sliced, 1 slice of turnip cut 
in cubes and 1 bunch of celery cut fine. Boil slowly for 
i l / 2 hours or until the potatoes are very soft. Mash 
through a sieve ; melt 2 tablespoons of butter ; add 2 table- 
spoons of flour, % tablespoon mace or nutmeg, %. salt- 
spoon of pepper and 1 teaspoon of salt. Stir into the 
soup and boil 5 minutes. Add 2 cups of hot cream or 
milk and more seasoning if needed, and a little chopped 
parsley. This soup should be of the consistency of thick 
cream. 

POTATO SOUP. (No. 2.) 
Cook 6 medium sized potatoes, in boiling salted water, 
until soft ; drain, then rub through a strainer. Scald 1 
quart of milk, add a slice or two of onion, then strain into 
the potatoes. Melt 3 tablespoons of butter in a sauce- 
pan, add 2 tablespoons flour, a dash of cayenne, a little 
celery salt, nutmeg, pepper and salt to taste. Stir until 
well mixed and then pour into the boiling soup. Cook 5 

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minutes; strain and sprinkle in I teaspoon of chopped 
parsley. 

TOMATO CLAM SOUP. 
Wash \y 2 pints of clams, add I cup of water; strain. 
Chop the hard part of the clams fine, add to it the clam 
water and i pint of tomatoes, I slice of onion, I teaspoon 
of salt and a few sprigs of celery. Cook 20 minutes. 
Strain. Add }i teaspoon of soda. Melt 4 tablespoons of 
butter, add 2 tablespoons of flour, add to the tomatoes 
and also the soft part of the clams. Cook slowly 
10 minutes then add 1 pint of milk, salt and pepper. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

One quart can of tomatoes, 1 pint of hot water, 2 
cloves, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 saltspoon pepper and 2 tea- 
spoons of sugar, 1 red pepper, cut up fine and free from 
seeds, a pinch of bi-carbonate of soda. Boil all together 
for 2 hours. Melt 4 tablespoons of butter, add 2 table- 
spoons of chopped onion, the same of parsley ; when pale 
yellow add 4 tablespoons of flour; stir into the tomatoes. 
Let simmer 15 minutes. Add more salt and pepper if 
needed. Strain and serve with toasted crackers. 

TOMATO SOUP. (No. 2.) 
Put into a granite stewpan 1 can tomatoes, 2 quarts 
cold water, pinch of soda, 1 onion sliced fine, 1 bay leaf 
and a few celery leaves or stalks ; when it comes to a 
boil, set back on range and simmer. After simmering 2 
hours, add y 2 cup of washed rice and cook slowly until 

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rice is tender. Add 1-3 cup of butter; season with 1 
tablespoon sugar, y 2 teaspoon cloves, pepper and salt to 
taste. This is like a puree. If too thick add more hot 
water. Serve hot with toasted crackers. A ham bone 
cooked with it improves it. 

CRECY SOUP. 

Wash, scrape and cut into cubes 12 fine young carrots. 
Cook in 2 teaspoons of butter with 1 tablespoon of raw 
chopped ham, 1 onion, y 2 turnip, a bay leaf, sweet mar- 
joram, a blade of mace and parsley. Stir while cooking ; 
add 1 quart of stock; simmer \y 2 hours. Melt 1 table- 
spoon of butter, add 1 tablespoon of flour, y 2 tea- 
spoon of salt, y 2 saltspoon pepper ; pour on the hot stock. 
Simmer 5 minutes. Strain and serve with croutons. 

BLACK BEAN SOUP. 

Soak 1 pint of black beans over night. Pour off the 
water and put on to boil in 2 quarts of fresh water, % 
teaspoon soda, y pound raw ham, cut up, 1 teaspoon of 
allspice, 4 cloves, parsley and thyme. Brown 1 onion in 
2 tablespoons of butter and add to the soup. Simmer 
4 hours or until beans are soft. Add a little cold water 
as it boils away, so as to have about 2 quarts when done. 
Press through a sieve, add 1 teaspoon of salt, l / 2 saltspoon 
pepper, a dash of cayenne, 1 lemon, 1 hard boiled egg, 
y 2 wineglass of sherry wine. Wine may be omitted. 

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New England Cook Book 



ONION SOUP. 

Six medium sized onions, cut fine ; fry in 2 tablespoons 
of butter, but do not let them brown; 1 quart of cold 
water, 1 bunch of parsley. Boil till soft — about 2 hours. 
Strain and add 1 quart of milk, and thicken with 2 
tablespoons of corn starch or 4 tablespoons of flour dis- 
solved in 2 tablespoons of cold water. Cook 10 minutes 
and, just before serving, add 6 tablespoons of butter. 
White stock may be used instead of butter, in which case 
it should be cooked another 1 hour. 

TURNIP SOUP. 

Boil 3 large turnips until soft, and mash in the water 
in which they were cooked. Rub through a coarse strainer 
and add enough stock to make it the consistency of thick 
cream. Boil all together for 10 minutes. Season with 
salt, sugar and black pepper or a few pods of red pepper 
to taste. Serve very hot. 

OKRA SOUP. (Southern recipe.) 

Cut up in small pieces *4 peck of okra. Skin y 2 peck 
tomatoes and put them with 10 pounds of shin or leg of 
beef into 10 quarts of cold water. Simmer for 7 hours, 
skimming often. Strain through a coarse strainer and 
season with salt and black or cayenne pepper. A ham bone 
boiled with the other ingredients is considered an im- 
provement by some people. Reheat and serve. 

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New England Cook Book 



SALMON SOUP. 
Remove the contents of a can of salmon; place in a 
bowl and let it become aerated for i hour. Remove 
skin and bones and rub through a strainer; season with 
salt and pepper. Put a slice of onion and 2 quarts of 
milk on to cook in a double boiler ; melt y 2 cup of butter, 
add l /\ cup of flour and pour on the hot milk. Strain, 
add the fish, reheat and serve at once. This recipe may 
be halved. 

CELERY SOUP. 

Boil 1 head of celery, cut into small pieces, in a pint of 
water 45 minutes; put 1 pint of milk, a small piece of 
mace and 1 slice of onion on to cook in a double boiler ; 
mix 1 tablespoon of flour with 2 tablespoons melted butter 
until smooth, and add to boiling milk. Cook 10 minutes. 
Mash celery in water in which it was cooked and stir into 
boiling milk. Season with salt and pepper. Strain and 
serve at once. A few pieces of celery, cut in inch pieces, 
may be cooked separately and put in whole after the 
soup has been strained and ready to be served. 

OYSTER SOUP. 

Put 1 pint of milk on to scald in a double boiler. Wash 
and cut up 3 or 4 stalks of celery and put on to boil in 
1 pint of boiling salted water. Put 1 quart of oysters 
in a bowl and pour over them 1 cup of cold water. Pick 
over carefully. Strain the oyster liquor into a stew-pan 
and put on to boil. Remove the scum; mash the celery 

35 



New England Cook Book 



in the water it was cooked in and strain into the oyster 
liquor; there should be I pint of liquid. Melt 4 table- 
spoons of butter and add 4 tablespoons of finely sifted 
cracker crumbs; add some of the milk and when thin 
enough to pour, turn into the oyster soup ; add 1 saltspoon 
of mace and cook 5 minutes. Add the remainder of the 
milk and the oysters and cook until the oysters are plump 
about 1 minute. One-quarter cup of hot cream may be 
added. Season with salt and pepper and serve at once. 

SPLIT PEA SOUP. 

Pick over and wash 1 cup of dried split peas. Soak 
over night. Drain ; put on to boil in 1 quart of cold 
water with 1 ounce of raw ham and y 2 onion ; simmer 
slowly till soft. Rub through a sieve. Return to fire 
and add thickening made of 2 tablespoons of butter 
melted, 2 tablespoons of flour, 1 teaspoon of sugar, 1 
teaspoon of salt and 1 saltspoon of pepper and 1 
saltspoon of celery salt. Boil for 5 minutes. Add enough 
hot milk, cream, stock or water to make it the consistency 
of a puree. Serve very hot, with croutons. 

MOCK BISQUE. 
One-half can of tomatoes, 4 tablespoons of butter, 2 
tablespoons of flour, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 saltspoon salt and 
1 teaspoon sugar. Stew the tomatoes until soft enough 
to strain. Scald 1 quart of milk in a double boiler. 
Melt the butter in a saucepan, add the flour, salt and 
pepper and enough hot milk to make it pour easily. Stir 

36 



New England Cook Book 



into the milk in double boiler and cook 5 mniutes ; add 
the strained tomatoes. Take from fire, add a pinch of 
soda, strain, add more pepper and salt. 

SCOTCH BROTH. 
Soak Y /2 cup of pearl barley over night. Wipe and cut 
2 pounds of neck of mutton, in small pieces ; add 2 quarts 
of cold water and soak 1 hour. Heat slowly, skim, add 
barley, skim again; simmer 1 hour; add y 2 cup each of 
diced carrot, turnip, onion, celery that have been fried 
in 1 tablespoon of butter. Simmer 3 hours. Season 
well, thicken with 2 tablespoons of butter, melted, and 
2 tablespoons of flour. Cook for 3 minutes longer; add 

1 tablespoon chopped parsley and serve. 

CORN CHOWDER. 

Cut enough green corn off the cob to make 1 quart ; 
pare and slice 5 medium sized potatoes; peel and slice 

2 onions. Cut x /$ pound of salt pork; add x /i teaspoon 
of pepper, \ l / 2 teaspoons of salt and 1 tablespoon flour 
and 1 tablespoon of butter. Boil cobs in water (enough 
to cover) for 15 minutes, then skim them out. Wash, 
pare and parboil potatoes for 5 minutes. Cut up pork 
into dice and put in omelet pan, and when melted add 
the onion and fry until light brown ; then turn all the fat 
into the corn water, removing the onion, after pressing 
all the juice out. Add potatoes, corn, salt and pepper; 
cover with boiling water and cook at least 20 minutes. 
Melt butter, add the flour and boil up once; then turn 

37 



New England Cook Book 



into the chowder and cook for 5 minutes. Add 1 pint 
of hot milk and serve very hot with toasted crackers. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

Take 34 pound of fat salt pork and fry until all the 
fat has been extracted ; add 1 large onion, cut into 
dice, and fry until a light yellow. Put 1 quart of 
fresh or 1 can of tomatoes on to boil; strain pork fat 
into the boiling tomatoes ; add the liquor from 12 large 
clams and an equal amount of cold water and 1 quart 
of parboiled potatoes, cut into cubes. Tie in a bag 6 
whole cloves and 6 allspice berries and drop into the 
boiling soup. Cook for 2 hours. Half an hour before 
it is done put in 12 large clams, chopped fine. Add 1 
teaspoon of table sauce, Worcestershire, etc., and 1 tea- 
spoon of salt and a pinch of pepper. Serve hot with 
crackers. 

BELMONT CHOWDER. 
Remove the skin and bones from a 3-pound fish, cut 
into large pieces, sprinkle with %. cup flour. Boil the 
bones in cold water (enough to cover) for 30 minutes; 
then strain. Cut and fry l /± pound of fat pork, add 2 
onions cut fine, 6 sprigs of parsley. Strain the fat into 
a stew-pan, add 2 cups of sliced and parboiled potatoes, 
1 teaspoon of white pepper and l / 2 saltspoon of red 
pepper, 2 teaspoons of salt, 6 whole cloves and 6 allspice 
berries, tied in a bag. Cover with \ x /o cups of clam 
liquor and the water in which the bones were boiled. 

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New England Cook Book 



Cook slowly for 40 minutes; add fish and soft part of 
the clams ; then add the beaten yolk of 1 egg, 2 table- 
spoons butter, 6 crackers, split; add more seasoning if 
necessary. Cook 5 minutes and serve. 

SALT CODFISH CHOWDER. 

Cut % pound of fat salt pork into bits; when melted 
fry 2 onions, cut in rings, to a golden brown. Pick 1 
pound of salt codfish into small pieces, rinse in cold 
water ; put in a saucepan, cover with cold water and put 
on the stove to heat, but not boil. In 2 hours add 1 
quart of potatoes that have been pared, sliced and par- 
boiled for 5 minutes. Strain the pork over the potatoes 
and fish and add 1 cup of boiling water. Cook until 
potatoes are soft. Add 1 cup each of scalded cream 
and milk and season with salt and cayenne. Serve at 
once with toasted crackers. The cream may be omitted 
and 1 pint of rich milk used. 



39 



CHAPTER III. 

Meat, Fish, Sauces and Croquettes 

HINTS ON COOKING MEAT. 

Meat should always be removed from paper as soon 
as it comes from market. 

Wipe meat with a damp cloth before cooking. 

The rule for broiling meat is to quickly sear each side, 
then remove it a little from the fire to finish cooking. 

When frying is desirable, always let the pan heat before 
putting in the fat, thus avoiding unnecessary smoke. 

When frying is done by immersion in deep fat, the 
article should always be drained on brown paper, unless 
in the case of doughnuts, when it is best to plunge them 
into rapidly boiling water and remove at once. 

Long, slow cooking is recommended for boiling meat, 
and when tough a pinch of soda or a little vinegar is 
added to make it tender. 

In roasting meat put some fat in the bottom of the pan 
and baste every 15 minutes; allow 20 minutes to the 
pound if liked well done; less time if liked rare. When 
done remove to hot platter. 

CURRY OF MUTTON. 
Cut 1 large onion fine and fry in 3 tablespoons of butter 
until it is a pale yellow. Mix 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 tea- 

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New England Cook Book 



spoon curry powder, 2 tablespoons of flour, a shake of 
pepper together, and add to the butter; then pour on 
1 pint of hot water and 1 cup of stewed and strained 
tomato slowly and mix well. Wipe and cut 2 pounds 
of lean mutton into small pieces and fry in hot fat (using 
the fat that had been removed). Add the meat to the 
sauce and simmer slowly until tender. 

BREAKFAST BACON. 
Cut the bacon into thin slices. Grease a broiler with 
the rind that has been removed and put in the bacon. 
Set the broiler into a dripping pan and put it into a hot 
oven. Cook until bacon is crisp, from 10 to 15 minutes. 
Drain on brown paper. The grease may be saved for 
frying purposes. 

BREAKFAST BACON. (No. 2 ) 
Cut off the rind and slice very thin ; cook in a frying 
pan until the fat is tried out and bacon is crisp. Drain 
on paper and serve. 

FRIZZLED BEEF. 
Take ^2 pound of smoked beef, cut into fine shavings. 
Pour warm water over it and let it simmer for 15 minutes. 
Drain and heat it in 2 tablespoons of butter. Make a 
cup of thin white sauce ; pour it over 1 egg, well beaten ; 
add the beef and season with salt and pepper. Serve 
very hot. 

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New England Cook Book 



HARICOT OF MUTTON. 
Wipe 2 pounds of mutton and cut into pieces suitable 
for serving, removing all superfluous fat, and put into 
a stewpan. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter and brown ; 
then add 4 tablespoons of flour. Pour on slowly 1 pint 
of hot water, add Yz teaspoon salt, y 2 saltspoon of pepper, 
1 bay leaf, 1 tablespoon mushroom catsup (if on hand), 
stalk of celery or a shake of celery salt. Pour this sauce 
over the meat. Cut a small carrot and onion into dice 
and cook for 10 minutes. Drain and add to the meat. 
Simmer for I hour. 

FRIED HAM. 

Cut the ham in thin slices, remove the outside and 
wipe ; then gash the meat and cook in a frying-pan till 
the fat is crisp. 

BEEF STEAK PIE. 
One quart of cold meat, cut in dice ; 2 slices of bacon, 
cut in small pieces ; 4 potatoes, cut into slices or dice, and 
parboiled 10 minutes. Fill a baking dish with meat, 
bacon and potatoes ; cover with a brown sauce made of 
1 tablespoon of butter, melted, 1 tablespoon of onion, 1 
tablespoon carrot, cut fine ; fry till light brown ; add 2 
tablespoons of flour and brown. Pour on slowly 1 pint 
of brown stock or liquor in which the meat was cooked. 
Season with salt and pepper. Cover with a biscuit crust 
and bake 24 of an hour. 

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New England Cook Book 



CRUST FOR BEEF STEAK PIE. 
One pint of flour, 2-3 or 1 cup of butter, ]/ 2 teaspoon 
of salt. Chop well ; mix into a dough with ice water. 

BOILED MUTTON OR LAMB. 
Trim and wipe the meat with a damp cloth. Have 
ready kettle of rapidly boiling salted water and put in 
meat and boil 5 minutes. Skim and simmer, allowing 
12 minutes for each pound of meat. Sometimes l /\ cup 
of rice is added to the meat. Serve with a Caper or 
Mint Sauce. Lamb should always be well done; mutton 
may be rare. 

LAMB OR MUTTON CHOPS. 
Wipe with a damp cloth ; remove the skin and extra 
fat. Heat frying-pan until it smokes all over ; then rub 
with a bit of fat. Lay in chops and sear first one side 
then the other ; then cook more slowly until done ( 5 
minutes if liked rare). Stand them up on the fat edge 
to brown the fat, without cooking the meat. When 
nearly done season with salt and pepper. Drain on 
paper and serve very hot on a hot dish previously rubbed 
with a little onion, thereby imparting a fine flavor. Chops 
may be broiled if preferred. 

IRISH STEW. 

Wipe and cut into pieces 2 pounds of the shoulder of 

mutton, removing skin and fat. Put a little of the fat 

into a heated saucepan, and when it boils remove the 

scraps of fat and add 3 or 4 onions, cut fine, and cook 

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New England Cook Book 



until light brown. Sprinkle the meat with salt, pepper 
and flour and add the onions ; when slightly brown cover 
with boiling water. Add i turnip and I carrot cut into 
cubes and parboiled. Simmer for 2 hours. Wash, pare 
and cut 4 large potatoes into slices and parboil for 5 
minutes ; drain, add to the stew and cook until potatoes 
are soft. Season with salt and pepper. Take out the 
dumplings, put meat and vegetables in the centre of a 
hot platter. Remove the fat, add more salt and pepper 
to the stew and, if not thick enough, add a little flour wet 
with cold water ; strain ; cook 5 minutes. Pour the gravy 
over the meat. 

DUMPLINGS. 
Sift 1 pint of flour, ]/ 2 teaspoon salt, 3 teaspoons baking 
powder together, mix 1 tablespoon butter with the tips of 
the fingers, moisten with sweet milk to make a soft dough. 
Toss on a floured board, pat it half an inch thick and cut 
into small rounds, or mix softer and drop by the spoonful 
into the boiling stew. Cook 15 minutes without removing 
the cover. 

PEASANT'S POTTAGE. (French chef.) 
Chop the meat of a cold turkey fine; add J4 cup of 
grated cheese, y 2 saltspoon of salt, ]/ 2 saltspoon pepper 
and % saltspoon nutmeg or mace. Make 4 slices of 
toast and put in bottom of a buttered baking dish. Mix 
1 cup of stock with the meat, add juice of l / 2 lemon and 
put over the toast. Moisten ]/ 2 cup of cracker crumbs 

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New England Cook Book 



with y± cup of melted butter and sprinkle on top. Bake 
45 minutes in a moderately hot oven. 

CASSEROLE OF MEAT. 
Chop the remains of any cold meat fine, add some 
bacon or ham, and for every pint of meat add Yz small 
onion, chopped fine, salt, pepper, parsley, sweet marjoram 
and a pinch of nutmeg to taste, I egg, well beaten, and 
2 tablespoons cracker crumbs. Moisten with gravy, stock 
or hot water. Pour into a dish, sprinkle buttered bread 
crumbs over the top. Bake y 2 hour and serve with 
tomato or curry sauce ; or butter a mould, line bottom 
and sides with cooked rice, fill centre with meat mixture 
and cover with a thick covering of rice. Steam I hour. 

PORTER HOUSE STEAK. 
Cut off all the superfluous fat and wipe with a damp 
cloth. Place on a broiler that has been greased with a 
bit of the fat from the steak and rubbed over with a 
slice of onion, having the fat next the handle. Broil 
over a bed of hot coals, searing each side every 10 
seconds, and letting it cook from 6 to 8 minutes. Serve 
with Maitre d'Hotel Butter. 

BEEF STEW. 
Cut 2 pounds of beef in small pieces. Melt some of 
the fat in a saucepan and when hot add one-half the meat 
which has been sprinkled with salt, pepper and flour. 
Put the tough part of the meat in a stew-pan, cover with 
cold water and, when it comes to a boil, remove the 

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New England Cook Book 



scum and add the browned meat and enough boiling 
water to cover ; simmer for 3 or 4 hours. Cut up and 
wash % cup each of carrots, turnips and onions and add 
them to the stew. Within 45 minutes of the stew being 
done cut 4 or 5 potatoes into slices and parboil for 5 
minutes. Drain and add to the stew. When meat and 
vegetables are cooked place in a dish and thicken the 
gravy with a little flour dissolved in cold water and cook 
for 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and strain. 
A beef bone is best for beef stew and should be removed 
before serving. 

PORK CHOPS. 

Wash, trim off skin and fat, and put them in a hot 
frying pan with a little salt pork fat or butter. Cook 
slowly, as they should be well done. Lay on a hot dish ; 
make a gravy, adding flour enough to absorb fat in pan, 
and when brown add hot water until of the right con- 
sistency. Season with salt, pepper and, if liked, y 2 cup 
of strained tomato and a little sugar. Cook 5 minutes ; 
pour over the chops and serve hot. 

ROAST PORK. 

The loin and the spare ribs are the best pieces for 
roasting. Rub well with pepper, sage, onion, salt and 
flour and 1 tablespoon of drippings, and bake 20 minutes 
for each pound. Baste often, and do not have the oven 
as hot as for other meat. Serve with apple sauce. 

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New England Cook Book 



TO ROAST BEEF. 
Wipe, put on a rack in a dripping pan, skin side down ; 
rub over with salt, pepper and dredge with flour and l /\. 
cup of drippings. Place in a hot oven, so as to sear the 
surface and keep the juices in. After the flour has 
browned, reduce the heat and baste with the fat; if meat 
is quite lean, put in some of the fat that has been cut off. 
Baste every 15 minutes, this making the meat more juicy. 
When meat is half done, turn it over, dredge with flour, 
baste, and have the skin well browned. 

ROAST BEEF GRAVY. 
Remove from the pan all the fat but %. cup ; place pan on 
front of range, add enough flour to absorb all the fat, 
stir until brown and well mixed. Add gradually enough 
boiling water until gravy is of the right consistency. Cook 
5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and strain. Be 
careful not to burn. 

YORKSHIRE PUDDING. 
Beat 3 eggs very light; add 1 pint of milk. Pour it y 
over 1 cup of flour and 1 teaspoon of salt. Beat well. 
Bake in hissing hot gem pans for 45 minutes. Baste with 
the drippings from the beef. Place gem pans in a drip- 
ping pan to prevent fat from getting on floor of oven. 

GRAVY FOR ROAST POULTRY. 

Put the giblets or neck, gizzard, liver and heart on to 
boil in 1 quart of water, and boil till tender and the water 
reduced to one-half. Pour off excess of fat in pan and 

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place pan on stove and sprinkle in sufficient flour to absorb 
fat. Stir until well browned and gradually add the water 
in which the giblets were cooked; stir till smooth and 
thick; strain. Season with salt and pepper. Add the 
liver, gizzard and heart, chopped fine. 

STUFFING. 
Moisten i cup of cracker or soft bread crumbs with 
1-3 cup of melted butter; season with 1 teaspoon of finely 
minced onion, salt, pepper, thyme and sage, marjoram or 
poultry seasoning. Fry in a hot buttered pan for 5 min- 
utes. This makes a dry stuffing. 

CHESTNUT STUFFING. 
Roast 1 pint of chestnuts and peel off the outer and 
inner skin. Take 1/2 pound and simmer in stock enough 
to cover ; drain and let them cool ; then pound them in a 
mortar with 4 tablespoons of butter, 3 ounces of bread 
crumbs, a small quantity of grated lemon peel and pow- 
dered mace, salt, and a pinch of cayenne ; bind the 
mixture with the beaten yolks of 2 eggs or 1 whole egg. 

SMOTHERED VEAL. (Creole style.) 
Wipe 3 veal cutlets and cut each into 3 or 4 pieces, and 
saute in a little hot butter. Melt 1 large tablespoon of 
butter in a saucepan, add 1 large onion, cut fine, and cook 
until a pale yellow. Peel and chop up one-half dozen 
tomatoes and put in saucepan with a red pepper bean, a 
sprig of parsley, and season with salt and pepper. Sim- 
mer until the tomato has thickened ; then add the veal, 

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cover and place where it will cook slowly for 30 minutes 
or until meat is done. 

BROILED HAM. 
Cut thin slices of ham and, if very salty, let soak in hot 
water for 20 or 30 minutes. Dry and put on a broiler 
and broil over a bed of hot coals for 5 minutes. Serve 
with poached eggs. 

TO BOIL A HAM. 
Soak over night in cold water. Scrub well; trim off 
the hard black part, cover with cold water, add a few 
cloves, a sprig of thyme and 2 bay leaves, and let it 
simmer slowly, allowing half an hour to the pound. 
Remove kettle and let it remain in the water until cool. 
Then remove the skin carefully and press a cloth over it 
to absorb as much grease as possible. Sprinkle sugar 
and grated crumbs over the top and place in the oven for 
nearly an hour to brown. Serve with currant jelly or 
cider sauce. 

FRICASSEE OF CHICKEN. 
Clean and disjoint chicken. Wipe each piece. Put in 
pot, cover with boiling water and add y^ tablespoon of 
salt, 1 slice of onion, 1 stalk of celery and simmer till 
tender, reducing the water to nearly 1 pint. (Remove 
scum occasionally.) To the liquor add i^ cups of milk 
or cream, and thicken with flour dissolved in a little cold 
water. Cook 5 minutes. Season with salt, pepper, a 
little mace, parsley and butter the size of an egg. Strain. 

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New England Cook Book 

ROAST DUCK. 

Pick, singe and remove the crop, oil bag, legs and 
pinions. Put ]/ 2 an onion in the body of the duck. Wipe, 
truss, dredge with salt, pepper, butter and flour. Roast 
in a very hot oven about 45 minutes. As ducks should 
be cooked rare, it is best not to stuff them. Squeeze the 
juice of 1 lemon over each one and serve with currant 
jelly and gravy made as for turkey, or serve with a sauce 
made of equal quantities of butter, currant jelly and port 
wine; melt the butter, add the jelly and, when melted, 
pour in the wine; bring to the boiling point and serve 
with the duck. 

BOILED DUCK. 

Plunge into boiling water, so that the feathers will 
come off easily ; wipe and dry inside and out. Take the 
gizzard, heart and liver and chop fine, adding 3 or 4 
shallots and 1 red pepper pod, finely minced, and 2 table- 
spoons of butter, melted. Stuff the bird with this mix- 
ture. Make a bouquet of a sprig of thyme, a little 
parsley, a couple of bay leaves and 2 or 3 cloves, and 
fasten to the breast; roll the duck in a wet cloth and 
wrap a cord around it; put into boiling salt water to cover 
and cook for 30 minutes or until thoroughly done. Re- 
move the cloth and bouquet, place on a hot dish, garnished 
with lemon points. Serve with currant sauce or gravy. 
This way of cooking a duck is preferable to roasting, as 
all the juices are retained. 

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New England Cook Book 



ROAST POULTRY. 

Singe ; remove pin feathers, oil bag, crop, entrails, legs 
and tendons. Wash and wipe, stuff, sew, tie or skewer 
into shape. Place on rack in a dripping pan, with breast 
uppermost; rub all over with softened butter; sprinkle 
with salt inside and outside, pepper and flour and a little 
water, and put in a hot oven. If liked a small piece of 
salt pork may be put on top ; if not, I large tablespoon of 
butter or drippings. When the flour is brown, check the 
heat, baste with the fat every 15 minutes. When each 
side browns, turn on the other side, so that all the chicken 
will be browned evenly. Roast 3 hours for an 8-pound 
turkey. If fowl is very large and heavy, lay several thick- 
nesses of brown paper over breast and legs that they may 
not burn. 

MOCK LAMB CHOPS. 
Take as many pork chops as needed. Wipe with a 
damp cloth and scrape the bone clear of meat, making 
them look like lamb chops. Dip in beaten egg, then in 
fine cracker crumbs and fry in hot fat until brown on 
both sides. Remove to a platter, place in the oven and 
make a sauce of 2 tablespoons butter ; when melted add 
2 tablespoons of flour and 1 cup of hot cream or milk. 
Season with salt, pepper and mace and pour over chops. 

CORN BEEF. 
Select a piece which, has a fair amount of fat, the 
brisket being especially good. If very salty soak in cold 

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New England Cook Book 



water for a little while. Put on to boil in enough cold water 
to cover and let simmer until you can pick it to pieces 
with a fork; when nearly done, let the water almost boil 
away and let the beef stand in the water until it is cool. 
Pack in a brick loaf pan, having the fibres run lengthwise 
of it; mix in the fat so it will be well marbled. Put a 
thin board, a little smaller than the pan, over it and press 
down with a heavy weight. When cold, cut into thin 
slices. 

MEAT TOAST. 
Take cold tongue, ham, beef or mutton and mince it 
very fine. Add yolk of I beaten egg and cream enough 
to moisten. Season to taste with salt, pepper, a shake of 
cayenne, celery salt, a pinch of sweet herbs, and a few 
drops of onion juice ; mix well and place in a saucepan 
and let it heat thoroughly over the fire. Toast as many 
slices of bread as needed, and butter slightly. Lay them 
on a flat dish that has been heated and cover each slice 
thickly with the hot mixture, and place on each slice a 
poached egg. Send to the table covered. This is a nice 
dish for breakfast or supper. 

MUTTON CHOPS ON PAPIER. 

Wipe and trim ,10 French chops. Take 3 boiled eggs 
and chop the whites very fine and mash the yolks through 
a sieve ; roll and sift 3 crackers, add to the eggs and mix 
well; then add y 2 an onion chopped fine, y 2 tablespoon 
butter, melted, salt and pepper to taste. Cream may be 

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added if the mixture is too thick to spread. Spread on 
each side of the chop, wrap in buttered paper and bake 
for 25 minutes. Remove the paper cases, place on hot 
platter, and garnish with parsley. 

BRAISED OXTAIL. 

Wipe and cut oxtail into joints, the larger ones into 
3-inch pieces ; put into a stewpan, cover with cold water 
and 1 tablespoon of salt ; bring to the boiling point ; strain, 
rinse the tail and wipe. Put into a stewpan 1 heaping 
tablespoon of butter or dripping, y 2 a carrot cut in long 
strips, 1 turnip, 2 or 3 onions, a little celery or celery 
leaves, 6 peppercorns or y 2 teaspoon of white pepper, a 
blade of mace, 3 or 4 cloves. Place the oxtail on the 
top, put on the cover and fry all the ingredients together 
for 20 minutes; then add 1-3 cup of well-flavored brown 
stock, y 2 glass of sherry. Put in the oven in a covered 
pan and cook gently for 3 hours, basting every 20 min- 
utes ; as the gravy boils away, add 1 cup of boiling water. 
Remove tail and strain gravy over it. 

HAMBURG STEAK. 
Chop 2 pounds of the round of beef and y 2 onion. 
Season with 2 teaspoons of salt and % teaspoon of 
pepper and a dash of cayenne. Make into flat cakes and 
fry in a hot spider in pork fat. Remove and drain on 
paper. Serve with gravy made by browning 1 tablespoon 
of flour in the pork fat, adding 1 cup of boiling water, 
and seasoning with salt and pepper. 

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New England Cook Book 

POT ROAST OF BEEF. 
Wipe with a clean, wet cloth and place the meat in a 
mixture of white wine vinegar, a dozen whole allspice 
berries, i dozen whole peppers, I bay leaf, for i day, 
turning meat occasionally; then remove meat, wipe dry. 
Melt some suet, add 2 onions, chopped fine, and put in 
meat and brown on all sides. Put into the meat kettle 
2 cupfuls of the spiced vinegar, 2 carrots, cut in dice. 
When it boils, add the browned meat, cover closely and 
simmer for 3 hours, turning the meat occasionally, and 
adding more vinegar as it boils away. Remove the meat ; 
strain the vinegar in which it was cooked, add 1 cupful 
of boiling water, salt to taste, and thicken with 2 table- 
spoons of flour, moistened in a little cold water. Just 
before serving 1 cup of cream may be added. Pour over 
the meat and serve very hot. This recipe requires four 
or five pounds of meat, from the middle of the rump, 
vein or round. 

BAKED PORK AND BEANS. 
Pick over carefully 1 quart of beans and let them soak 
over night. In the morning wash and drain in another 
water. Put on to boil in cold water with y 2 teaspoon of 
soda and cook 24 oi an hour; turn into a colander and 
drain ; put into a bean pot and, when filled, bury a piece 
of pork (y 2 pound), well scored, leaving only the rind 
exposed; sprinkle with a pinch of salt and red pepper 
and add 2 tablespoons of molasses. Cover with hot 

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water and bake in a moderate oven 8 hours. Keep closely 
covered so they will not burn ; add more water if neces- 
sary until the last hour, and then let them bake nearly 
dry, removing the cover to allow them to brown. The 
beans cannot cook too long. Serve with Chili Sauce. 

BAKED PORK AND BEANS. (Southern recipe.) 
Soak 2 quarts of pea beans in cold water over night. 
In the morning, drain and put them in fresh cold water 
and a pinch of soda and simmer until the beans are soft ; 
then turn into the colander and pour cold water over 
them. Whilst beans are cooking, cut I pound of pork 
into strips and put on to boil, separately, until well done. 
Place the beans in a bean pot, moisten with a little of the 
water the pork was boiled in ; add i teaspoon of mustard 
and 3 tablespoons of molasses and stir until well mixed. 
Bury the pork in the middle of the beans, leaving only 
the rind exposed. Set into a hot oven for y 2 hour to 
brown. 

BAKED FISH. 

Clean, wipe and dry the fish, rub with salt and pepper 
and lemon juice; stuff and sew. Cut gashes 2 inches 
apart and insert strips of salt pork ; skewer into shape of 
S and put on a fish sheet in a dripping pan ; put the 
trimmings from the pork around the fish and brush over 
with melted butter and flour. Put it into a hot oven 
without water, baste often and bake I hour. Remove 
carefully on to a hot platter. Serve with a sauce. 

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New England Cook Book 



STUFFING. 
Mix i cup of cracker crumbs, }4 teaspoon of salt, I 
teaspoon of lemon juice, i saltspoon of pepper, i teaspoon 
parsley, 2 tablespoons chopped onion, 1 teaspoon poultry 
seasoning and %. cup melted butter; moisten with hot 
water. 

HALIBUT A LA CREOLE. 
Wipe 4 pounds of halibut, scrape off the black skin. 
Season with salt and pepper. Put the fish on a baking 
sheet and pour over it a tomato sauce ; baste 3 or 4 times 
and bake for 1 hour. When done serve on a platter; 
pour the sauce that remains over it. This is delicious. 

FILLETS OF HALIBUT A LA POULETTE. 

Cut \]/2 pounds halibut in long, narrow strips. Sprinkle 
with salt, pepper, lemon juice and add thin slices of onion. 
Cover and let stand y 2 hour; remove the onion, dip the 
strips in melted butter. Skewer into shape, dredge with 
flour and bake about 20 minutes. Serve with white 
sauce, in which 1 sprig of parsley, 1 bay leaf and 1 slice 
of onion have been boiled with the milk. 

CLAMS A LA CREME. 
Drain and chop 1 quart of clams. Melt 4 tablespoons 
butter, add 4 tablespoons of flour ; strain and pour on the 
clam liquor, add 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 saltspoon of 
pepper, 1 saltspoon of celery salt and cook 3 minutes. 
Add clams and boil up once. Serve with toast. 

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New England Cook Book 



CREAMED FISH. 
Four pounds of cod or haddock, i pint of cream sauce, 
I cup of cracker crumbs moistened in 1-3 cup of melted 
butter. Put the fish into boiling water, enough to cover, 
to which has been added 1 tablespoon of salt and 1 table- 
spoon of vinegar, and let simmer until the fish separates 
easily. Then lift out of the water and drain. When 
cool, remove the skin and all the bones and pick apart 
in flakes. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon of salt and 1 tea- 
spoon of pepper. Put a layer of fish on a platter ; cover 
with a rich white sauce, letting it soak in ; then a layer 
of fish and continue doing so until all are used. Moisten 
cracker crumbs in melted butter and spread over the fish. 
Place platter on the upper part of oven grate, over a pan 
of hot water and bake until the crumbs are light brown. 

RICH SAUCE FOR CREAMED FISH. 
Melt 2 tablespoons of butter, add 2 heaping tablespoons 
of flour, Yz teaspoon of salt and y 2 saltspoon of pepper ; 
put a sprig of parsley, 1 slice onion, J^ blade of mace, I 
bay leaf and 1 pint of milk on to cook, in double boiler, for 
15 minutes; strain; then pour over butter and flour and 
add the yolks of 2 eggs or 1 whole egg beaten. 

HALIBUT AU GRATIN. 
One pint of cooked halibut, free from skin and bones, 
1 Yz cups of cream or milk, 2 tablespoons of flour, 2 table- 
spoons of butter, i 1 /* teaspoons of salt, 1 saltspoon of 
pepper, 1 teaspoonful of onion juice and l /i cup of bread 

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crumbs. Flake the fish with a fork, sprinkle and mix 
with half the salt and pepper. Put the milk on to scald 
in a double boiler ; melt the butter, add the flour and the 
remainder of the salt and pepper; pour on the hot milk 
slowly until the mixture is free from lumps; then add 
the onion juice. This mixture may be put on a platter or 
arranged on six scalloped shells by putting a spoonful of 
the sauce on the shells, then a thin layer of the fish and 
alternate until the dishes are filled. Melt I tablespoon of 
butter and add the bread crumbs, cover the scalloped 
dishes with this ; place all the dishes in a pan and put 
in a hot oven, to brown, for 10 or 15 minutes. 

FISH TOAST. 

Toast 6 slices of bread, 1 pint of cold cooked fish, freed 
from skin and bone, 1^2 cups of milk, 4 tablespoons of 
butter, 2 tablespoons of flour, a dash of red pepper or 
paprika, 1 J/? teaspoons of salt and 1 teaspoon of 
lemon juice. Put one-half the quantity of milk on to 
scald in a double boiler. Melt the butter and add the 
flour, salt and pepper, and cook for 5 minutes, being care- 
ful not to burn. Pour the scalded milk on slowly, and 
when free from lumps turn into the double boiler, add 
the fish and let cook for 10 minutes. Beat the eggs until 
light ; add the remainder of the cold milk. Turn this into 
the double boiler, stir all together and remove from fire. 
Add the lemon juice and spread the fish mixture on hot 

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New England Cook Book 



buttered toast and serve at once. This dish is not satis- 
factory if it is allowed to become cold. 

SCALLOPED SALMON. 
Scald i cupful of milk in a double boiler. Melt I 
tablespoon butter, add 2 tablespoons flour, salt and pepper 
to taste ; pour milk on slowly and, when thick as cream, 
add 1 can of salmon that has been drained and cut up 
into small pieces. Butter a shallow dish, put in the mix- 
ture, grate a little nutmeg over it and cover with 1 cup 
of powdered cracker crumbs, stirred into 1-3 cup of 
melted butter. Bake until crumbs are brown. 

FISH BALLS. 

One cup of raw salt codfish, picked and flaked, 1 pint 
of raw sliced potatoes, 1 well beaten egg, 1 teaspoon of 
butter, y 2 teaspoon of onion juice. Parboil potatoes for 
5 minutes; wash the fish. Put fish and potatoes in a 
stewpan and cover with boiling water. Boil 20 minutes 
or until the potatoes are soft. Do not let them boil long 
enough to become soggy. Drain off every drop of water ; 
mash until creamy and light; add butter, onion juice, 
pepper and salt if needed and, when slightly cool, add 
the beaten egg. Shape on a tablespoon, put in a frying 
basket (not more than four or five) and cook 1 minute. 
Drain on unglazed brown paper. These are very delicate. 

FLAKED FISH. (Creole style.) 
Free the remnant of any cooked fish of skin and bone ; 
flake. Cream *4 cup of butter, add 1 teaspoon dry mus- 

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tard, a dash of cayenne, and salt to taste; moisten with 
lemon juice, to form a smooth paste. Put the fish on 
buttered shells or platter, cover with paste and sprinkle 
buttered cracker crumbs over the whole. Bake 10 min- 
utes. Serve with cress, moistened with lemon juice. 

ESCALLOPED FISH. 

Make a cup of sauce, rather thick as given for creamed 
fish ; butter a baking dish, and, having freed the remnants 
of the fish from skin and bone, flake it and put a layer 
of it into the dish, with the cream sauce, to moisten it; 
continue alternating, having the sauce for the last layer. 
Cover with buttered cracker or bread crumbs and bake 
until crumbs are brown. 

CREAMED FINNAN HADDIE. (Norwegian recipe.) 
Cut up a fish weighing 4 or 5 pounds into several good 
sized pieces and put on to boil with a small onion, cut 
into slices, 1 tablespoon vinegar and cook until the flesh 
separates from the bone. Drain and, when cool, remove 
the skin and bones, and cut it up in small pieces and add 
about a teaspoon of poultry seasoning or mixed herbs ; 
mix it with a cream sauce and let it heat up. Season with 
a little nutmeg ; sprinkle with finely chopped parsley. 

BOILED SALMON. 
Place in a frying basket or put in whole, tied in a piece 
of cheesecloth, and have enough boiling water in sauce- 
pan to cover fish ; add 1 tablespoon salt and 1 tablespoon 
lemon juice, and cook until fish separates from the bone. 

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When done, remove skin, place on a hot platter and pour 
white sauce over it, or serve with Hollandaise sauce. 

BROILED OYSTERS. 

Wash, pick and drain large oysters; sprinkle with a 
pinch of mace ; dip in melted butter or beaten egg, then in 
fine cracker crumbs, and broil in fine wire broiler over a 
clear, hot fire. 

BROILED SMELTS. (Swedish recipe.) 
After dressing, smelts are laid on a towel to dry. Cut 
as many white papers as you have fish and spread with 
buttered cracker crumbs. Wrap in paper and broil over 
a bright fire from 5 to 8 minutes. 

FRIED FISH. 
Fish for frying should be thoroughly cleaned and dried, 
seasoned with salt and pepper and sprinkled on both sides 
with indian meal or cracker crumbs. Fry in hot butter 
or lard ( l / 2 butter and l / 2 lard makes a good mixture for 
frying fish) from 2 to 5 minutes. Drain on brown paper. 
Serve with tomato or tartare sauce. 

BROILED FISH. 
Clean, wash with a wet cloth and wipe dry. Split so 
when laid flat the back bone will be in the middle ; cover 
with a mixture of 3 tablespoons of olive oil, 1 tablespoon 
vinegar, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 saltspoon pepper and 1 table- 
spoon of chopped onion. Set away in a cool place. Drain 
and place on a buttered gridiron, flesh side down, over a 

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clear fire until brown ; then turn. When done, place on a 
hot platter and serve with tartare sauce. 

BROILED FINNAN HADDIE. 
Rub broiler with butter or a piece of pork fat; put in 
finnan haddie rubbed with butter and broil ; sprinkle with 
salt and pepper. Serve with horse radish sauce. 

LOBSTER NEWBURG. 
Cut i pint of boiled lobster meat in small pieces and 
heat with i wineglass of sherry wine, I tablespoon of 
brandy, a little pepper and salt and 2 rounding tablespoons 
of butter. Cook 2 or 3 minutes. Beat in yolks of '4 eggs, 
2 tablespoons of butter and 1 pint of cream. Serve at 
once. 

POINTS TO REMEMBER. 

This is the formulae for most sauces : Melt the butter, 
put in the flour, to which has been added all the dry 
seasonings ; stir till the mixture bubbles all over ; then 
gradually add the hot liquid, beating after each addition 
before putting more in. The constant beating renders it 
smooth and glossy as nothing else can make it. Cook 
slowly for a few minutes; if too thick add more hot 
liquid. 

HOW TO ADD YOLKS OF EGGS TO SOUPS 
AND SAUCES. 
In adding yolks of eggs to soups and sauces (to insure 
richness), beat yolks very light, add a little of the hot 

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liquid and mix until smooth; then add enough more to 
have it pour easily. 

TO BROWN FLOUR. 

Put the flour in a shallow pan and set in a moderately 
hot oven. Stir often to prevent burning and have it of 
uniform color — good, rich brown when done. If desired 
to keep it on hand for brown gravies and sauces, let it 
cool when taken from the oven, then put in glass jars and 
it is ready for use. 

MAITRE D' HOTEL SAUCE. 
Chop i tablespoon of parsley to a powder, then add a 
little chives; mix these with I heaping tablespoon of 
butter, creamed, I teaspoon of lemon juice, a speck of 
nutmeg, ^2 saltspoon pepper and y 2 teaspoon of salt. 
Spread on hot beef steak. 

CREOLE SAUCE. 
Yolks of 4 hard boiled eggs, x / 2 cup each of tarragon, 
cress, chives and parsley, all pounded to a paste and 
then sifted through a wire sieve. Add 1 cup of olive oil. 
2 tablespoons lemon juice, a pinch of salt and a dash of 
cayenne pepper and a pinch of anisette. Stir with a 
wooden spoon. To be served with flaked cold fish or any 
cold meat. 

CREOLE SAUCE. (No. 2.) 
Boil 1 egg hard ; rub the yolk smooth with a little cold 
water, then add 1 teaspoon mustard, 1 saltspoon of salt 
and a dash of cayenne pepper. Take 2 pinches (about 

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]/ 2 cup) of chives and shallot and the smallest bit of 
garlic; boil these i minute in water. Strain them and 
hash fine. Rub into the egg mixture, oil and vinegar 
until you have the quantity needed (about %. cup of oil 
and ]/ 2 tablespoon vinegar) ; lastly add the herbs and 
pour over cold meat. This sauce is nice with fish or 
poured over eggs, boiled, it makes a nice entree. 

HORSE RADISH SAUCE. 

Four tablespoons of grated horse radish (using the 
horse radish root), I tablespoon of vinegar or lemon juice, 
y 2 teaspoon of salt, i teaspoon of powdered sugar, dash 
of cayenne pepper and y 2 cup of heavy cream. Mix and 
heat over boiling water. 

MINT SAUCE. 
One-half cupful chopped mint, Y^ cupful of sugar, y 2 
cupful of vinegar, grain of salt. Use only the leaves and 
tender tips of the mint. Let it stand 1 hour before using. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 
Put 1 pint tomato, 1 cup of water, 3 cloves, a dash of 
cayenne, a pinch of soda, 1 teaspoon of poultry seasoning, 
1 teaspoon sugar, 1 slice of onion, on to boil for 30 min- 
utes. Melt 4 tablespoons butter, add 2 tablespoons flour, 
y 2 teaspoon salt, y 2 saltspoon pepper. Simmer 10 min- 
utes and strain over boiled meat or fish. A little parsley 
may be cooked in it if liked. 

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CURRY SAUCE. 
Melt 2 tablespoons of butter, add I tablespoon of 
chopped onion and cook slowly for 5 minutes. Add 1 
teaspoon of curry powder and 2 tablespoons flour and 
cook for 10 minutes; then add 1 cup of white stock or 
mutton liquor free from grease. Cook 10 minutes; season 
with salt and pepper. Strain. 

WHITE SAUCE. 
Melt 2 tablespoons of butter ; mix 2 tablespoons flour, 
1 saltspoon white pepper, y 2 teaspoon salt and add to the 
melted butter; mix well, being careful not to burn it; 
then pour on gradually 1 cup of hot milk. Beat until 
smooth and free from lumps. 

EGG SAUCE, (for fish.) 
To 1 cup of white sauce add 2 hard boiled eggs, 
chopped fine, 1 tablespoon chopped parsley, 1 teaspoon of 
lemon juice. Parsley is not to be added until after being 
removed from fire. 

ONION SAUCE. 

Boil 1 pint of onions in boiling salted water for half 
an hour, changing the water two or three times. Drain, 
add 1 teaspoon sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, cover and 
stew slowly for 1 hour, being careful lest they burn ; rub 
through a sieve, add y 2 cup of white stock, 1 cup of milk, 
1 teaspoon salt, 1 saltspoon pepper. Melt 4 tablespoons 
butter, add 2 tablespoons flour and add to the onion. 
Cook 5 minutes, stirring well and serve very hot. 

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DRAWN BUTTER SAUCE. 

Melt l / 2 cup of butter, add 4 tablespoons of flour, mixed 
with ]/ 2 teaspoon salt, shake of pepper and 1 pint of hot 
water, poured on slowly. 

THICK CREAM SAUCE. (For croquettes.) 
Scald 1 pint of thick cream or rich milk. Melt 2 table- 
spoons of butter, add 4 tablespoons of flour, ]/ 2 teaspoon 
salt, dash of cayenne, y 2 teaspoon celery salt. Pour cream 
on slowly and beat well. This sauce is very thick. 

CAPER SAUCE. 
To each cup of drawn butter sauce add 1 tablespoon 
of chopped capers and 1 teaspoon lemon juice. Chopped 
cucumbers and pickles may be used instead. 

BECHAMEL SAUCE. 

Melt 4 tablespoons butter, add 3 tablespoons of 
flour, 9 peppercorns, a bit of mace, very small slice of 
onion and carrot, 1 bay leaf, sprig of parsley and 1 pint of 
hot stock ; simmer 20 minutes ; strain and add 1 cup of 
milk or cream ; if yellow sauce be desired add the beaten 
yolks of 2 eggs. 

VELVET SAUCE. 
Melt 1 heaping tablespoon of butter in a saucepan, 
add 2 tablespoons of flour and stir well, being careful not 
to let it get brown; add 3 cups of white stock slowly, 
stirring until well mixed, and beat until smooth and thick. 
Add 4 parsley stalks, 1 bay leaf, 1 sprig of thyme, 2 
cloves, all tied together; salt and pepper to taste. Boil 

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the sauce for 10 minutes, stirring continuously; then place 
where it will simmer for I hour. Strain and place on ice. 
If not to be used at once, put a few bits of butter on top 
to prevent crust from forming. 

OLIVE SAUCE. 
Rmove stones from i dozen olives, leaving meat in I 
piece. Cover with boiling water and cook 5 minutes. 
Drain and chop fine. Melt 4 tablespoons of butter, add 
6 tablespoons of flour, 1 teaspoon of minced onion and 
cook until light brown, stirring constantly; add i J / 2 cups 
of brown stock, a little at a time ; stir until smooth ; season 
with salt and pepper. Strain ; add the chopped olives. 

SAUCE TARTARE. 
Make l / 2 pint of mayonnaise dressing No. 2; chop 
very fine 1 tablespoon each of chopped capers, olives, 
pickles, a shallot and parsley. Put in a towel and dry. 
Add to the mayonnaise and mix thoroughly. This will 
keep for several weeks; if too thick, add a little more 
melted butter and vinegar. 

CIDER SAUCE. 
Melt yk cup of butter, add 1-3 cup of flour and mix 
well ; then gradually pour in 1 pint of hot ham liquor, and 
when smooth stir in 1-3 cup of hot cider. Season with 
a little salt, pepper and a few grains of cayenne or 
paprika. 

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MAITRE D'HOTEL BUTTER. 
Cream J4 cup of butter, add y 2 teaspoon salt, y 2 salt- 
spoon pepper, dash of cayenne, i tablespoon chopped 
parsley, i tablespoon lemon juice. Keep very cold. 
Serve with fried fish or broiled steak. 

ONION SAUCE FOR BEEF. (German recipe.) 
Melt 2 tablespoons butter, add i small onion, chopped 
fine, and cook until a pale yellow ; add 2 tablespoons of 
flour : season with salt, pepper to taste, enough to flavor 
slightly, and a dust of sugar if liked. Stir the mixture 
thoroughly; add juice of your meat and a dash of cold 
water and serve hot. 

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE. 
Cream y 2 cup butter, add the unbeaten yolks of 2 eggs ; 
stir well and add 2 tablespoons lemon juice, a dash each 
of salt, pepper and y 2 cup boiling water ; cook in a double 
boiler until thick as boiled custard. Add 1 teaspoon of 
capers and serve immediately. 

FISH CROQUETTES. 
Free from skin and bone 1 pint of cold cooked fresh 
fish and tear into shreds; add 1 pint of hot mashed 
potatoes, 1 tablespoon of butter, y 2 cup of hot milk, 1 
well beaten egg, 1 rounding teaspoon of salt, y 2 saltspoon 
of pepper, 1 teaspoon of chopped parsley and a few drops 
of onion juice. Mix all these thoroughly together and 
set away to cool; when the mixture is cold, shape into 
balls, then dip in beaten egg, then in fine bread crumbs, 

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then in egg again. Just before serving time, place the 
croquetter in a frying basket and plunge into the boiling 
fat and cook 2 minutes. Remove from basket and drain 
on brown paper. Serve at once. These may be prepared 
the previous day, frying them when needed. 

OYSTER CROQUETTES. 

One pint of oysters, washed and drained ; parboil until 
the edges are curled. Drain, saving the liquor ; chop 
oysters. Melt 4 tablespoons of butter, add 4 tablespoons 
of flour ;pour on slowly l / 2 cup of oyster liquor and ]/ 2 cup 
of cream. Add 1 teaspoon chopped parsley, a few grains 
of cayenne, celery salt, mace, y 2 teaspoon salt and the 
beaten yolks of 2 eggs. Cook 2 or 3 minutes ; add oysters. 
Cool, shape, roll in crumbs, egg and crumbs, and fry in 
smoking hot fat. Drain on brown paper. If sauce is too 
thin, thicken with cracker crumbs. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

To 1 pint of cooked rice add 1 egg well beaten, 1 table- 
spoon butter, salt, pepper, sugar and cayenne to taste, 1 
tablespoon of parsley. Cool, shape, roll, fry as usual. 
If cold rice be used, warm in a saucepan and add enough 
milk to soften. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

Chop up cold cooked salmon, and for every pint of fish 

add 1 teaspoon salt, y 2 teaspoon mustard, speck of 

cayenne, a few drops of onion juice, 1 tablespoon parsley. 

Moisten with 1 cup of thick cream sauce and pour over I 

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egg, well beaten. When thoroughly mixed, spread on a 
platter. When cool, shape like croquettes. Roll in 
crumbs, beaten egg, and then in crumbs again. Fry in 
smoking hot fat. Drain on brown paper. If canned 
salmon be used, drain off the oil and remove the bones, 
and chop the salmon fine. 

POTATO CROQUETTES. 
One pint of hot mashed potatoes, 2 tablespoons of but- 
ter, season with salt, pepper, onion juice, a speck of 
cayenne, nutmeg, celery salt. When slightly cool, add 
the beaten yolk of 1 egg. Put through a seive and add 2 
teaspoons of chopped parsley. Shape into smooth round 
balls, then into rolls. Roll in fine bread crumbs, then dip 
in beaten egg, then roll in crumbs again. Fry in smoking 
hot fat for 1 minute. Drain on brown paper. 

HOMINY CROQUETTES. 
Warm 1 pint of cooked hominy in 2 tablespoons of 
cream or milk ; add 1 beaten egg and a pinch of salt and 
mace. Cool, shape, roll in crumbs, dip in beaten egg, and 
then in crumbs again. Fry in deep boiling fat and drain 
on brown paper. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

Chop cold veal very fine; season highly with salt, 
pepper, cayenne, onion juice, celery salt, nutmeg or mace 
and parsley, mixing all the seasonings together before 
adding to the meat. Moisten with cream sauce and 1 egg, 
well beaten. Cool, shape into rolls. Roll in sifted bread 

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crumbs, then in beaten egg and again in crumbs. Fry in 
smoking hot fat. Drain on brown paper. 

BEEF CROQUETTES. 

Chop cold roast beef very fine, add y 2 the quantity of 
bread crumbs, that has been previously soaked in stock or 
milk, to moisten. Melt I tablespoon of butter and I 
tablespoon of onion and cook to a pale yellow, season 
with y 2 teaspoon of salt, l / 2 saltspoon of pepper, I table- 
spoon of tomato ketchup, add to the first mixture and 
stir over the fire until smooth, then add the beaten yolk of 
i egg. When cool make into croquettes, dip in crumbs, 
beaten egg, then in crumbs again. Fry in smoking hot 
fat. Drain on brown paper. Serve with tomato or 
curry sauce. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 
Chop ]/ 2 lb. of chicken quite fine, add I teaspoon of 
salt, i saltspoon of paprika, I teaspoon lemon juice, a 
little parsley, a few drops of onion juice and a pinch of 
nutmeg and celery salt. Moisten with a thick cream 
sauce, to which add I egg, well beaten, and when thor- 
oughly moistened, set away to cool. Roll in crumbs, eggs, 
and crumbs, and fry in smoking hot fat. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES (NO. 2). 

To y 2 pint each of chicken and sweetbreads, chopped 

very fine, add y 2 cup of powdered cracker crumbs, 1 

beaten egg and enough white sauce to moisten; season 

with salt, pepper, onion juice and mace. Shape in any 

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shape desired; roll in fine cracker crumbs, then in beaten 
egg and lastly in cracker crumbs. Fry in smoking hot 
fat. Drain on paper. 

MEAT CROQUETTES. 
These are made of left overs, any meat from roast 
beef, pork, lamb or mutton or chops ; a thin slice of sau- 
sage, ham or tongue may be added and all chopped very 
fine. Season I cup of meat highly with salt, pepper, 
onion juice, I teaspoon lemon juice, nutmeg, thyme, mar- 
joram, celery salt or poultry seasoning, I tablespoon of 
cracker crumbs and add I cup of cream or gravy to 
moisten and I beaten egg. Cool. Shape. Roll in crumbs, 
beaten egg and crumbs again. Fry in smoking hot fat. 
Drain. 

LOBSTER CROQUETTES. 

Make a white sauce by melting i tablespoon butter and 
adding 2 tablespoons of flour; pour on slowly 1 cup of 
hot milk ; when thickened stir in 1 pint of lobster meat, I 
beaten egg, the juice of J^ a lemon, a dash of cayenne 
and salt. If too soft, add a little sifted bread crumbs. 
Roll in crumbs, then in egg, then crumbs again, and fry 
in the usual manner. 

FRITTER BATTER. 

Beat 2 eggs very light, add y 2 pint of milk. Sift 2 

cups of flour, a pinch of salt, x / 2 teaspoon of soda and 1 

rounding teaspoon cream of tartar together and add to 

the first mixture. Beat well, add I tablespoon of melted 

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butter. (Two rounding teaspoons of baking powder may 
be used in place of soda and cream of tartar.) 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Wipe, pare, core and cut apples in small pieces and 
stir into batter. Drop by spoonfuls and fry in deep fat, 
boiling, until a light brown. Drain on brown paper and 
sprinkle with powdered sugar or powdered sugar and 
cinnamon. 

BANANA FRITTERS. 
Peel bananas, cut in lengthwise slices, cover with 
sugar and lemon juice and i tablespoon wine and let 
steep on back of stove for y 2 hour. Drain. Add 4 table- 
spoons of sugar to fritter batter and dip each slice in 
batter; fry in deep fat, and drain on brown paper. 
Sprinkle with powdered sugar. 

FRUIT FRITTERS. 

Fresh peaches or apricots may be cut in small pieces, 
sprinkled with sugar and let stand 10 or 15 minutes; then 
add to fritter batter and fry as other fritters. Canned 
fruit may be used, after draining from their syrup, using 
the syrup for a sauce. 

CLAM FRITTERS. 
Drain and chop a pint of clams and season with salt 
and pepper. Make a fritter batter, using the clam liquor 
instead of milk. Add the chopped clams and fry in small 
spoonfuls in hot fat. Drain on brown paper. 

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CORN FRITTERS. 
Add I pint of scraped corn, (cooked), season with salt 
and pepper, to fritter batter and beat well. Fry in small 
spoonfuls. Drain. 

OYSTER FRITTERS. 

Make the same as clam fritters, using oysters instead 
of clams. 



74 



CHAPTER IV. 

Eggs, Vegetables and Salads 

PLAIN OMELET. 
Beat the yolks of 2 eggs till light colored and thick; 
add 2 tablespoons of milk, % teaspoon of salt and a shake 
of pepper. Beat the whites of 2 eggs till stiff and dry. 
Cut and fold them into the yolks till just covered. Have 
a clean, smooth omelet pan ; when hot, rub 1 teaspoon of 
butter around the edge with a broad knife, let the butter 
run all over the pan, and when bubbling turn in omelet 
quickly and spread it evenly on the pan ; shake and stir 
until the eggs commence to set. Put it on the upper 
grate of the oven to dry. Then run a broad knife round 
the edge, crease through the middle and fold over on a 
hot platter. 

ORANGE OMELET. 

Beat the yolks of 2 eggs, very light, add 2 tablespoons 
orange juice and about 1 teaspoon of the grated rind, and 
4 teaspoons of powdered sugar and a pinch of salt. Beat 
the whites stiff, fold in lightly. Cook in an ometlet pan. 
Spread with sweetened pulp of 2 oranges. Fold over 
and turn out. Sprinkle with sugar. 

RICH OMELETTE. 

Beat the yolks of 5 eggs until thick and lemon color, 
add 1 tea-cup of milk. Mix 1 large tablespoon flour, I 

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teaspoon salt and a little pepper together ; pour over this 
the egg mixture, add 2 tablespoons butter, melted. Pour 
mixture into a hot buttered spider and let it harden a 
little, then add the whites beaten to a stiff froth. As it 
cooks, lift with a griddle cake turner, so that the 
uncooked part may run underneath. Place on hotter 
part of range to brown, shaking the pan continuously. 
Crease with back of knife and fold over. 

SOFT FRIED EGGS. 

Heat a frying pan thoroughly and add a piece of butter 
or bacon fat size of an egg. Place muffin rings in pan 
and break eggs into them, sprinkle with salt and pepper, 
dip the melted fat over them, with a spoon, and cook 
until white is firm. Remove muffin rings and serve eggs 
at once. 

SOFT BOILED EGGS. 

Drop into boiling water, put saucepan, covered, where it 
will simmer, but not boil, for 8 or 10 minutes, or until 
the egg dries as soon as removed from water. Or 

Put into cold water, place over a hot fire, and when 
water boils, remove the egg. 

EGG VERMICELLI. 

Boil 3 eggs 20 minutes. Separate the yolks and chop 
the whites fine. Make 1 cup of thin white sauce and stir 
the whites into it and mix well. Pour the sauce over 4 
or 5 slices of toast and rub the yolks through a strainer 

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over the whole. Garnish with points of toast and slices 
of bacon. 

CUPPED EGGS. 
Put i tablespoon of good high-seasoned brown gravy 
into each cup and set the cups in a pan of boiling water. 
When gravy heats, drop a fresh egg into each cup. Set 
the pan on back of stove, cover it until the eggs are 
cooked. Serve on a hot plate. 

POACHED EGGS. 

Place 4 muffin rings in a pan of boiling water and add 
i teaspoon of salt. Break the eggs one at a time in a 
saucer and then slip off carefully into a ring. Baste each 
with hot water while cooking. Let simmer until firm 
enough to lift with a skimmer; place on buttered toast. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 

Beat 4 eggs slightly, add ]/ 2 cup of milk, y 2 teaspoon 
salt, i saltspoon pepper. Put 2 teaspoons butter in a 
saucepan, and when it bubbles turn in the egg mixture 
and cook over boiling water until creamy. Serve at 
once. Chopped ham or tongue may be added, just before 
removing from fire (about 1 tablespoon). 

STUFFED EGGS. 

Boil 6 eggs 20 minutes. Plunge into cold water for 1 
minute. Remove the shells and cut lengthwise, then 
scoop out the yolk, being careful not to break the white ; 
put the two whites of each egg together. Mash the yolk, 
add y 2 the quantity of cold ham chopped fine, a few 

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drops of onion juice, I teaspoon melted butter, dash of 
cayenne, a few grains of celery salt and a little chopped 
parsley. If veal, chicken or lamb be used, season highly 
with salt, cayenne, mustard and chopped parsley. Fill 
the whites with the mixture, smooth them, and press the 
two halves together. Spread the remainder of the mix- 
ture on a buttered dish, place the eggs on it. Cover 
with a thin white sauce; sprinkle with buttered cracker 
crumbs and cheese and bake until a light brown. 

STUFFED EGGS. (No. 2.) 
Drop as many eggs as needed into boiling water ; cover 
and place the saucepan where the water will keep hot 
without boiling, about 20 or 30 minutes. Plunge the eggs 
in cold water for 1 minute; remove the shells and cut in 
halves lengthwise. With a sharp pointed knife, take out 
the yolk and mash through a coarse strainer; add l /z 
quantity of chicken, veal, beef or lamb and moisten with 
Sauce Tartare. Fill the whites with this mixture, and 
press the two halves together. When ready to serve, 
pour over the rest of the sauce. Mayonnaise dressing 
may be used. This is nice for lunch or picnics. 

EGG SANDWICHES. 

Chop the white of hard boiled eggs very fine. Put the 
yolks through a strainer and mix with them melted butter 
or cream to moisten, salt and pepper to taste; then add 
the chopped whites and spread on buttered bread, cut 
very thin, putting two together. 

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HAM SANDWICHES. 

Cream y 2 cup of butter, add i teaspoon made mustard, 
yi teaspoon salt, shake of cayenne pepper and the beaten 
yolk of i egg. Mix with finely minced ham and spread 
on thin slices of bread, cut in any shape desired. One 
teaspoon each of finely chopped pickles, capers, onion and 
parsley may be added, if desired. 

ROAST BEEF SANDWICH. 

Cut some rare beef and chop very fine; season with 
salt and pepper. To l /z cup of Mayonnaise dressing add 
2 tablespoons of whipped cream, i small tablespoon 
grated horse radish and 2 teaspoons of chopped olives or 
cucumbers, and mix enough chopped beef to spread 
easily. Butter end of loaf of bread and cut slices very 
thin; spread evenly with the meat. Cut in any desired 
shape. 

HINTS ON COOKING VEGETABLES. 

The principle underlying the cooking of vegetables are 
the softening of the cellulose, the cooking of the starch 
properly, the saving of the proteids and minerals and 
rendering the proteids more digestible and the develop- 
ment of flavor. 

Firm vegetables, as roots or fibres, are best baked; 
owing to the high temperature of the oven, the bursting 
of the starch cells takes place properly. 

Any green vegetable is best cooked slowly in its own 
juice, thus retaining the mineral salt. 

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All green vegetables should be cooked with the sauce 
pan uncovered. 

Have them as fresh as possible, and cook on day they 
are gathered. Pick over, and cut off any decayed leaves 
and wash in several waters. Put vegetables, when pared, 
into cold water to prevent discoloration, until ready to 
cook in boiling salted water. 

HASHED BROWN POTATOES. 

One quart of cold potatoes cut into cubes, sprinkle with 
i teaspoon salt, I saltspoon of pepper. Brown i table- 
spoon of butter, add i tablespoon of flour and mix well ; 
pour on slowly i cup of stock, add potatoes ; season with 
salt and peper. Cook 10 minutes, fold over and brown. 

FRIED POTATOES. 

Cut cold potatoes into slices about a quarter of an inch. 
Melt 2 or 3 tablespoons of drippings in a frying pan, and 
when hot, add the potatoes, season with salt and pepper. 
Cook potatoes until brown, then turn and brown the other 
side, i tablespoon of cold chopped ham may be sprinkled 
over the potatoes. 

POTATOES EN SURPRISE. 

Season i pint of hot mashed potatoes with 2 table- 
spoons of butter, ]/ 2 saltspoon of pepper, speck of 
cayenne, y 2 teaspoon of salt, 1 saltspoon of celery salt 
and a few drops of onion juice. When slightly cool add 
the yolk of 1 egg, beaten well. Shape into small balls 
and fill the centers with creamed fish or meat ; roll in 

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crumbs, then in egg and then in crumbs again. Fry in 
hot lard until light brown. Drain on brown paper and 
serve hot. 

POTATOES A LA MAITRE D' HOTEL. 
Prepare the Maitre d'Hotel butter. Cream 2 table- 
spoons of butter, add 1 teaspoon lemon juice, y 2 teaspoon 
salt, 1 saltspoon pepper and a shake of celery salt, 1 
tablespoon chopped parsley. Cut 1 pint cold potatoes in 
cubes and put in a hot spider, add enough milk to cover, 
and when nearly absorbed stir in the Maitre d'Hotel 
butter and serve at once. 

MASHED POTATOES. 

Mash boiled potatoes with a wire masher until free 
from lumps. For every 2 cups of potato add 2 table- 
spoons of butter, 1 teaspoon salt, % teaspoon each of 
white pepper and celery salt, and enough hot milk to 
moisten. Beat vigorously and pile lightly on a hot dish. 
Do not put in the oven, as that makes them heavy. 

CREAMED POTATOES. 

Cut cold boiled potatoes into cubes. Melt 2 table- 
spoons butter, add 4 tablespoons of flour, 1 saltspoon salt 
and a shake of pepper and cook until well mixed, being 
careful not to burn. Then pour on gradually 1 pint of 
boiling milk and beat well to prevent lumps. Add 1 pint 
of potatoes and stir until they become hot. Add 1 tea- 
spoon of chopped parsley and serve at once. 

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LYONNAISE POTATOES. 

Melt i tablespoon of butter, add I tablespoon of 
chopped onion and cook until a pale yellow. Then add I 
pint of cold potatoes cut in cubes, season with salt and 
pepper. Stir with a fork until all the butter has been 
absorbed, being careful not to break. Add i tablespoon 
of chopped parsley and serve very hot. 

BOILED POTATOES. 

Select potatoes of uniform size. Scrub thoroughly, 
either with a small brush or coarse cloth. Pare them 
(except when new) as thinly as possible, and soak in cold 
water. Put on to boil in a porcelain or granite stewpan 
and cover with boiling water, to which has been added I 
tablespoon of salt, and cook gently for half an hour or 
until soft ; should potatoes remain hard in the centre add 
I cup of cold water and continue boiling until done. 
Drain off every drop of water and serve at once. If 
necessary to wait, place on back of range and cover with 
a folded towel, to let the steam escape. 

BAKED POTATOES. 

Select smooth potatoes of the same size. Scrub well. 
Bake on the grate, in a hot oven, for I hour or until soft. 
Turn once or twice whilst baking. Pinch to break the 
skin and let the steam escape. Serve at once. 

FRANCONIA POTATOES. (Baked with meat.) 

Select potatoes of uniform size. Scrub, pare and soak 
in cold water. Put in the dripping pan with meat, and 

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baste when meat is basted. They can be parboiled for 
10 minutes if in a hurry. Time required for baking about 
40 minutes. 

POTATO SOUFFLE. 

Choose 3 potatoes as nearly alike as possible in size 
and shape ; scrub and bake, and when well done cut in 
halves lengthwise or remove 1 thick slice and carefully 
scoop out the inside. Mash, and add 1 tablespoon butter, 
1 tablespoon of hot milk, 1 saltspoon of salt and a shake 
of cayenne or paprika. Beat the whites of 2 eggs stiff 
or 1 whole egg and mix it with the potato and pile lightly 
in the skins, heaping them on top. Moisten the tops with 
a little of the egg. 

STUFFED EGG PLANT. (Southern recipe.) 

Cut egg plant in halves, crosswise; scoop out the pulp, 
being careful not to work too near the skin. Mash the 
pulp, add 1 cup of finely sifted cracker crumbs, butter 
the size of an egg, a little salt, and pepper to taste, and 
about % teaspoon mace, and moisten with a little hot 
water or stock. Fill shells with stuffing, smoothing it 
even with the top. Sprinkle a little very fine cracker 
crumbs over and dot with butter. Bake in a hot oven 
about one-half an hour. 

STEWED TOMATOES. 

Pour boiling water over them, remove skins and the 
hard green stem. Cut them up and stew slowly in a 
saucepan until the juice has nearly boiled away. Add 

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salt, pepper, butter and sugar. If you like, you may 
thicken with cracker crumbs. 

BOILED CARROTS. 

Wash, scrape and cut into half-inch dice; put on to 
cook in boiling salted water until tender. Drain; add 
pepper, salt and a little butter, stir well and serve at 
once. 

BOILED BEETS. 

Wash and boil beets for I hour or until tender, in boil- 
ing salted water. When cooked put in a pan of cold 
water and rub off the skins and slice thin. Serve with 
salt, pepper and vinegar or cut into cubes and serve with 
white sauce. 

STRING BEANS. 

Cut off all strings carefully; break into short lengths 
and wash. Boil in salted water until tender, from i to 3 
hours. Drain. Season with butter, salt, pepper and 
nutmeg, or pour over 1 cup of thin white sauce to 1 quart 
of beans and simmer 10 minutes. Serve at once. 

MASHED TURNIPS. 
Wash and cut French turnips into half-inch slices ; pare 
and cut into cubes. Cook in boiling salted water until 
tender. Drain. Mash and season with butter, pepper 
and salt. 

BAKED SQUASH. 
Wash and cut a Hubbard squash into halves. Remove 
the seeds and pulp, scrape thoroughly, place on the grate 

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of the oven and bake nearly 2 hours. When done, 
remove from the shell, put through a colander and season 
to taste with 3 teaspoons salt, 1 teaspoon pepper, 2 tea- 
spoons sugar, 3 tablespoons butter and a grating of nut- 
meg, for a squash weighing 6 or 7 pounds. 

BOILED SQUASH. (Southern recipe.) 
Wash and cut in slices, then in cubes, and put on to 
cook in boiling water, to which has been added a table- 
spoon of salt and 1 tablespoon of sugar, and cook until 
soft. Season with butter, salt and pepper. Put in a dish, 
set in the oven for about 20 minutes to dry. (Drain well 
before putting it into the oven.) 

BOILED ONIONS. 

Pour boiling water over them, and rub off the skin. 
Put them in boiling salted water and cook for 5 minutes. 
Drain ; put on again in boiling salted water and cook until 
tender, but not broken. Drain, and pour over white 
sauce, and serve hot. 

STUFFED PEPPERS. 

Select large peppers, cut in halves, crosswise ; remove 
seeds with an apple corer, cut off the stem, and keep in 
salted water until ready to use. Drain. For 6 peppers, 
chop enough veal, chicken or lamb, free from gristle and 
fat, to make 1 cup. Cook y 2 cup of milk and y 2 cup of 
bread crumbs together, until a smooth paste is formed. 
Add 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 saltspoon white pepper, a few 
drops of onion juice, 2 teaspoons butter, 2 eggs, well 

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beaten, meat and I tablespoon of parsley, if on hand. 
Mix thoroughly, and fill the peppers with the mixture. 
Set them into an agate pan, and pour 3 cups of white 
stock or water around them. Bake about 30 minutes in 
a moderate oven. Baste the peppers (not the filling) 
every 10 minutes. If liked highly seasoned, a few of the 
seeds may be used in the filling. These may be also 
cooked by placing in a stewpan, adding 1 bay leaf to the 
water and simmer three-quarters of an hour. 
BAKED ONION. 

Boil, and if large, cut into quarters. Put into a shallow 
dish, cover with a white sauce and buttered crumbs and 
bake until brown. 

BOILED CABBAGE. 

Select a small heavy cabbage. Remove the outside 
leaves, cut into quarters, cut off the tough stalk, soak in 
salted water for 1 hour. Have a kettle of rapidly boiling 
salted water. Add % teaspoon soda and cabbage. Uncover 
and keep at a galloping boil, for 1 hour or until tender. 
Drain. Chop fine, season with salt and pepper; put in a 
hot dish and serve. 

Hint: Put a little vinegar in a separate saucepan, and 
let it boil all the time, and you will have no odor of cab- 
bage cooking. 

CREAMED TURNIPS. 

Wash turnips, cut in slices and then in y 2 -inch cubes. 
Cook 1 quart in boiling salted water until soft. Drain ; 
pour over 1 pint of white sauce. 

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CAULIFLOWER. 

The leaves should be green and fresh, and the heads 
creamy white. Pick off the outside leaves. Wash and 
put on to cook gently in boiling salted water I hour, or 
until tender. Take up with a skimmer, being careful not 
to break it. Pour over it a cream sauce. 
ARTICHOKES. 

Peel and throw into cold water and vinegar. Cook in 
boiling salted water until tender ; remove at once. Drain. 
Serve with white sauce. 

EGG PLANT. 

Cut into slices J^-inch thick; soak in cold water (to 
which salt has been added) for i hour, and wipe peel 
dry. Dip each slice in cracker crumbs, beaten egg, and 
then in crumbs again. Fry in hot fat in a frying pan for 
10 minutes. The slices will be soft and moist when 
done. 

SPINACH. 

Pick over, trim off the roots and decayed leaves. Wash 
several times in warm water, changing the spinach from 
one pan to another, that the sand may be left in the 
water, and continue washing until the water looks clear. 
(Warm water cleans it best.) Put the spinach in a large 
saucepan and place on the back of the range. When 
there is about a tablespoon of water, push a little forward, 
where it will cook slowly (uncovered), in its own juices, 
until tender. Drain, and chop fine in a chopping tray. 
For Yz peck of spinach add 3 tablespoons of butter, ^ 

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New England Cook Book 



teaspoon salt, a shake of cayenne and a grating of nut- 
meg. Heat again and serve very hot. 

SPINACH NO. 2. (French style.) 

Pick over, wash in several waters until free from grit. 
Put the spinach in a saucepan with plenty of boiling 
salted water. Stir it frequently, letting it boil 15 or 20 
minutes. Take it out, and drain through a strainer. 
Chop very fine and drain off every drop of water. For 1 
peck of spinach, put 2 large tablespoons of butter into a 
saucepan and melt ; add 1 large tablespoon flour, 4 or 5 
spoonfuls of rich cream, 1 teaspoon sugar and 1 salt- 
spoon nutmeg. Mix well, and when they have come to 
a boil, add the spinach; simmer for 10 minutes, stirring 
frequently. Serve at once. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Wash carefully and break into small pieces as far as 
each stalk can be broken easily. Cook in boiling salted 
water for 20 minutes or until tender. Drain, season 
with salt, pepper and butter, or pour over white sauce. 

GREEN PEAS. 

Wash the pods ; then shell ; put into boiling salted water 
and cook 20 minutes, or until tender. Let the water boil 
nearly away and serve without draining. Season with 
salt, Y-2 saltspoon pepper, y 2 saltspoon nutmeg, 1 table- 
spoon butter and a little sugar. A tablespoon of cream 
may be added. 

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STUFFED TOMATOES. 

Cut a thin slice from the stem end of large, smooth 
tomatoes; remove the seeds and soft pulp and mix with 
it an equal amount of buttered cracker or bread crumbs, 
season to taste with salt, pepper, sugar and onion juice, a 
bay leaf (ground) and a pinch of nutmeg. If not moist 
enough, add a little hot gravy or water. Fill cavities with 
this mixture and sprinkle buttered cracker crumbs over 
the top, allowing I cup of crumbs to 1-3 cup of melted 
butter. Bake in a hot oven about 20 minutes. A bit of 
ham or bacon, chopped fine, may be used with the filling, 
if liked. 

CORN. 

Remove the husks and every thread of the silky fibre. 
Put into a saucepan of boiling water, and cook 10 to 15 
minutes. Long cooking renders corn tough. 
CELERY. 

Wash, scrape clean and cut the stalks into inch pieces ; 
cook in boiling salted water until soft. Drain, and mix 
with a white sauce. Serve hot at once. 
BOILED PUMPKIN. 

Wash, cut into quarters, pare, remove seeds and steam 
or cook in boiling salted water. Scrape out the soft part, 
rub through a coarse strainer; season with salt, pepper, 
sugar, a few grains of nutmeg and a little butter. 

OYSTER PLANT. 

Scrape and throw at once into cold water, with a little 
vinegar, to keep it from being discolored. Cook in boil- 

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ing salted water until tender. Drain, cut about an inch 
long and mix with a white sauce, or dip in fritter batter 
and fry in smoking hot fat. 

SHELL BEANS. 

Wash and cook in boiling salted water and cook until 
tender. Turn into a colander, pour boiling water over 
them, and season with salt, pepper and butter. Serve at 
once. 

BOILED RICE. 

Put i cup of rice in cold water and rub thoroughly 
between the hands ; put on to boil in 2 quarts of cold 
water until tender. Drain. 

SCALLOPED CABBAGE. 

Soak 2 heads of cabbage, cut in slices, 1 hour. Boil 
until tender ; drain, chop the cabbage, rather coarse. Melt 

2 tablespoons of butter in a frying pan, add 2 
tablespoons of flour and the cabbage, and cook 

3 or 4 minutes; stir well, and add about 1 
cup of milk, season with salt and pepper to taste; sim- 
mer 10 minutes. Put in a baking dish, cover with but- 
tered cracker crumbs and bake until light brown. 

SCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Remove the contents of a can of tomatoes and let it 
(to become aerated) stand for 1 hour; season with a 
pinch of soda, salt, pepper, sugar and nutmeg to taste. 
Butter a deep dish and sprinkle with a little fine cracker 
crumbs. Pour in the tomatoes and cover with 1 cup of 



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cracker crumbs moistened in y 2 cup of melted butter. 
Bake in the oven about 30 minutes, or until crumbs are 
brown. Raw tomatoes may be used by arranging them 
in the following manner. A layer of sliced raw tomatoes, 
seasoning, and then a layer of buttered cracker crumbs, 
and so on until all are used, having cracker crumbs on 
top. Bake until soft. 

STUFFED ONIONS. 

Boil 6 onions 1 hour, cool, then with a sharp knife cut 
a piece from the centre of each; mix 2 tablespoons 
chopped ham, 3 of stale bread crumbs, 2 tablespoons of 
butter (melted), 3 tablespoons of cream or milk, salt to 
taste and a shake of cayenne together. Fill cavities with 
this mixture. Sprinkle with buttered cracker crumbs 
and bake slowly y 2 hour. Serve with white sauce. 

FRIED TOMATOES. 

Wipe and cut into slices about y 2 -inch thick. Mix y 2 
cup of flour and 1 tablespoon of brown sugar, 1 saltspoon 
of black pepper, y 2 teaspoon salt and 1 saltspoon of 
cayenne pepper together. Dredge well on both sides with 
the dry mixture and fry in equal parts of drippings and 
lard. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 

Wipe and remove a thin slice from stem end of a half 
dozen tomatoes. Dip the top of the tomato in beaten egg, 
then in cracker crumbs, in which a little sugar, salt and 

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pepper have been mixed ; dot over with bits of butter and 
bake in a hot oven until soft. 

IRISH CREAM CABBAGE. 

Wash in several waters I white hard head of cabbage. 
Boil until tender; drain, chop very fine; add Yn large 
onion, mix well together and place in saucepan. Add I 
cup of cream or 2 cups of milk thickened with butter and 
flour and seasoned with salt and pepper. Serve very hot. 

CREAMED PARSNIPS. 

Wash parsnips well, pare and place in a saucepan with 
fresh boiling water ; cook until tender. Drain, and cut 
in small pieces about an inch long. Pour over it a white 
sauce that has been thickened to liking, and boil slowly 
for 5 minutes. 

MACARONI. 

Break 1 pound of macaroni into small pieces and put 
on to cook in plenty of boiling salted water for 10 min- 
utes; remove the cover, stir the macaroni well and cook 
until it can be cut in two with a fork. Drain and let cold 
water run over it through the colander, to remove pasti- 
ness ; then place strainer over hot water to heat again. 
Put 1 tablespoon butter on to melt in a saucepan, add 
macaroni and 1 cup of tomato sauce; toss over the fire 
until thoroughly mixed, sprinkle it rather thickly with 
grated Parmesan cheese and pour it into a hot dish, add- 
ing, if liked, 1 or 2 tablespoons of strong gravy or stock 
to the mixture. Serve at once. Macaroni may be served 

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with white sauce, grated cheese or cracker crumbs on top 
and baked for 10 minutes. 

MACARONI NO. 2. (Italian recipe.) 
Have a large kettle nearly full of rapidly boiling water. 
Break 1 pound of macaroni into 2 or 3-inch pieces and 
drop into the water and boil for 1 hour, or until tender, 
adding a handful of salt, after it has been boiling ]/z 
hour; just before taking it off, pour in 1 cup of cold 
water. Drain, put in a hot dish, set on back of range, 
add a little pepper, a lump of cheese, and, when melted, 
stir, and serve at once. In place of cheese, tomato sauce 
may be poured over it. 

STEAMED RICE. 
Pick over and wash 1 cup of rice in several waters 
until it looks clear. Put in a double boiler with 2 cups of 
boiling water and a teaspoon salt. Steam 30 minutes, or 
until the grains feel soft when crushed between the 
fingers. 

LETTUCE. 

Lettuce leaves should be thoroughly washed and dried 
without breaking the leaves. To dry them, place in a 
wire basket and swing the leaves until dry. A bag of 
cheese cloth will answer. They may then be laid in a 
cool place, wrapped in a damp cloth. 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

Six tablespoons oil, 2 tablespoons tarragon vinegar, J/2 
teaspoon salt, 1 saltspoon paprika, Add the salt and 

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pepper to the oil and mix thoroughly ; add vinegar, drop 
by drop, and stir vigirously. This mixture will separate 
in about 20 minutes. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

One-half teaspoon of salt, y 2 teaspoon of mustard, x / 2 
teaspoon of powdered sugar, a few grains of cayenne, the 
yolks of 2 raw eggs, 1 pint of olive oil, 2 tablespoons 
lemon juice and 2 tablespoons of vinegar. Mix the dry 
ingredients in a bowl. Add the yolks of the eggs, which 
must be fresh ; beat with a wooden spoon until the mix- 
ture is slightly thickened; add x / 2 teaspoon vinegar, and 
when well blended with the other ingredients, add the oil, 
drop by drop, beating constantly. After several tea- 
spoons of oil have been used, the oil may be added faster. 
When the mixture becomes too thick, add a little of the 
lemon juice, then more oil, and continue alternating, and 
lastly add the vinegar. Put on ice. Never mix it with 
anything until ready to use, as it liquifies. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING (NO. 2). 
Yolks of 2 hard boiled eggs, yolks of 2 raw eggs, 1 tea- 
spoon of salt, 1 tablespoon of mustard, a pinch of cayenne 
pepper, y 2 cup of melted butter, y 2 cup of vinegar. Rub 
the yolks of the hard boiled eggs smooth, using a small 
wooden spoon; beat in the yolks of the raw eggs, then 
add salt, pepper, mustard. Beat well. Add vinegar 
and butter alternately, using only a little at a time. 

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BOILED DRESSING (NO. 2). 

Mix l / 2 teaspoon salt, pepper and mustard to taste, 2 
tablespoons flour, 1 heaping tablespoon butter, melted, and 
1 egg, well beaten. Beat them all together, then pour 
over y 2 cup of hot vinegar ; set on stove and let come to 
a boil. 

CELERY SALAD. 

Wash and cut celery into half -inch length pieces ; 
moisten with a little vinegar, salt, dash of cayenne and 
pour over it mayonnaise dressing. This salad is to be 
served at once. 

POTATO AND WATERCRESS SALAD. 

Cut into cubes freshly boiled potatoes and season 
slightly with salt, pepper, oil and vinegar. Add carefully 
picked watercress, similarly seasoned ; mix well and 
serve with stoned olives or triangular croutons, spread 
alternately with egg and anchovy butter. 

DANDELION SALAD. 

Cut some dandelions as low down as possible so as to 
get white stalks ; wash thoroughly and mix with an equal 
quantity of watercress and a few drops of onion juice. 
Dress with French dressing. 

BEET SALAD. 
Cut cold cooked beets into cubes, marinate with a 
French dressing and place on ice until ready to serve. 
Add more dressing and place on crisp lettuce leaves and 
serve. 

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COLD SLAW. 

Take 2 cups of finely shaved cabbage. Boil 1 scant 
cup of vinegar, add 1 heaping tablespoon of butter ; pour 
this over 2 eggs, well beaten, to which has been added 1 
tablespoon of mustard, J4 teaspoon of salt, a shake of 
cayenne pepper and 2 teaspoons sugar. Mix well and 
pour over the cabbage. 

CELERY AND CHICKEN SALAD IN TOMATO CUPS. 

Cut in centres from the tops of some tomatoes that 
are firm and uniform in shape; scoop out the inside after 
cutting away the fleshy sections with a sharp knife, then 
when quite hollow set on ice until serving time ; lift from 
the ice with a spoon or broad knife, so as not to get them 
out of shape. For the filling, cut 1 stalk of celery into 
very small cubes ; chop 1 apple very fine and sprinkle 
with lemon juice, chop y 2 cup of chicken meat, rather 
coarsely, and mix all together with a French dressing. 
Put this into the tomato cups and place a heaping table- 
spoonful of mayonnaise on top of each. Garnish with 
watercress. In very warm weather cover tomato cups 
with cracked ice and salt, to have them keep their shape. 

DUCK SALAD. 

One cupful of duck, chopped very fine, 4 oranges 
sliced and cut fine and freed from seeds and skins, 2 
lemons, sliced and cut fine, and 1 cupful of chopped 
celery. Mix together and place on lettuce leaves. Cook 
1 cup of English walnuts, 1 quart of water, 1 slice of 

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onion, I bay leaf, salt and pepper. Drain. Put nuts 
over the salad and cover with a mayonnaise or boiled 
dressing. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

Take equal parts of cherries, raspberries and currants, 
keep on ice till needed, then cover with a foamy sauce. 
This sauce will be found very nice for any fruit salad. 
FRUIT SALAD (NO. 2). 

Equal parts of each. Take pineapple and slice very 
thin, removing cores, sliced oranges cut in circles, seeds 
removed, and bananas, sliced thin. The pineapple should 
be covered in sugar for 10 or 12 hours and chilled before 
adding to the other. Place in a salad bowl and mix all 
together, sprinkle with powdered sugar, and pour over 1 
cup of sweet muscatel wine. Garnish with candied 
cherries cut in quarters. 

SPRING SALAD. 

Take crisp white celery and cut it into dice, and tart 
juicy apples, cut as fine as the celery, and cover with 
lemon juice. Use one-half as much celery as apple. 
Cover with a French dressing and place on the ice. When 
ready to serve, place on lettuce leaves and cover with a 
mayonnaise dressing. 

SALMON SALAD. 

Cut 1 pint of salmon into dice, season with a French 
dressing and set on ice until ready to serve. Add enough 
more French dressing to make it very moist. Make a 

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mayonnaise dressing, add I tablespoon each of chopped 
capers and olives and gherkin pickles. Then add one-half 
of the mayonnaise dressing to the salmon and mix well. 
Place on lettuce leaves and cover with the remainder of 
the mayonnaise. 

TOMATO SALAD. 

Mix i scant tablespoon of sugar, y 2 teaspoon of salt, a 
pinch of red pepper, I teaspoon of mustard, %. cup of 
cream, 2 eggs, slightly beaten, and l / 2 cup of vinegar. 
Cook over boiling water until thick like custard. Put 
on ice, and when ready to serve, pour over peeled sliced 
tomatoes placed on lettuce leaves. 

SHRIMP SALAD. (Chef.) 

One can of shrimps, 3 or 4 whole tomatoes, cut into 
slices, the inside leaves of 2 heads of lettuce ; the whole 
covered with the following dressing: Boil 2 scant table- 
spoons of mixed mustard and 2 full tablespoons of 
vinegar together and stir in the beaten yolks of 4 eggs, ]/ 2 
cup of cream and J4 pound of butter; cook in double 
boiler until it looks like soft custard; if it looks too thick 
add a little more cream. Add 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 tea- 
spoon of sugar, 3 drops of onion juice and l /± saltspoon 
of cayenne pepper. Strain and set away. This dressing 
will keep a fortnight on ice. 

SHRIMP SALAD (NO. 2). 

Cut the shrimps rather fine with a sharp knife and 
mix with French dressing. At serving time, heap upon 
crisp lettuce leaves and pour over mayonnaise dressing. 

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SHRIMP SALAD (NO 3). 

Cut shrimps up fine and moisten with a dressing made 
of 3 tablespoons olive oil, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 1 salt- 
spoon salt and a dash of cayenne. Serve on a crisp let- 
tuce leaf on each plate. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Cut into shreds the meat of a lobster and season with 
plenty of French dressing, and keep on ice until ready to 
serve. Mix with enough of the mayonnaise dressing to 
moisten. Make cups of crisp lettuce leaves, fill with 
salad and cover with mayonnaise dressing. Garnish 
with capers and coral. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Cut 1 pint of cooked chicken intb dice, add y 2 pint of 
crisp celery, also cut in dice. Pour over this a dressing 
made of 2 tablespoons oil, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 salt- 
spoon paprika, 1 tablespoon vinegar. Mix well and set 
away in a cold place. Just before serving add 1 table- 
spoon each of chopped olives and capers and mix all with 
2 tablespoons of mayonnaise dressing. Place in a salad 
bowl, pour the remainder of the dressing over it and 
garnish with lettuce leaves. 

MOCK CHICKEN SALAD. 

Cut 1 pint of cooked fresh pork into dice, add ]/z pint 
of crisp celery, also cut in dice. Pour over this a dress- 
ing made of 2 tablespoons of oil, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 
tablespoon of vinegar. Mix well and set away in a cold 

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place. Just before serving, add i tablespoon of chopped 
olives, i tablespoon of capers and I red pepper that has 
been parboiled, seeds removed and chopped very fine, and 
mix all with 2 tablespoons of mayonnaise. Place in a 
salad bowl, pour the' remainder of the dressing over it and 
garnish with lettuce leaves. 

APPLE AND NUT SALAD. 

Chop up equal portions of greenings and any kind of 
nut meat, mix with mayonnaise dressing to moisten. 
Place on a crisp lettuce leaf, cover with mayonnaise 
dressing and garnish with olives, celery leaves and slices 
of hard-boiled eggs. This may be served on a large 
platter. 

CLUB SALAD. 

Take the meat from the breast of a duck, slightly rare, 
and cut into dice, add ^2 the quantity of crisp white 
celery, also diced. Make a bed in the salad bowl of 
crisp lettuce leaves, a little French sorrel and a sprinkling 
of chives; mix the meat and celery, put over the greens 
and cover with a French dressing. When ready to serve, 
garnish with ]/\ of a tart orange and a few radishes and 
put on top 1 large tablespoon of mayonnaise dressing. 

LETTUCE SALAD. 

Pick over and wash each leaf, without breaking. Put 
in a bag made of cheese cloth and shake until dry. Keep 
the lettuce in a cool place until ready to serve. Arrange 
the leaves in a salad bowl, the larger ones around the edge 

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and the smaller ones in the centre. Serve with a boiled 
dressing or sugar, salt and vinegar to taste. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Slice freshly boiled potatoes, and when cool toss them 
lightly in oil and vinegar; add a sprinkling of chopped 
shallot or chives. Add }& the quantity of smoked sal- 
mon; season with enough more oil to make it moist, add 
salt and pepper to taste. Cold boiled potatoes may be 
used, but are not as satisfactory. 

POTATO SALAD (NO. 2). 

Wash and boil 6 large potatoes, without paring, and 
when done let them cool. Peel, cut into slices or cubes 
and pour the dressing over, whilst hot. Mix together 2 
tablespoons of cream, 1 tablespoon oil, 2 tablespoons of 
tarragon or cider vinegar, dash of cayenne, salt to taste, 1 
tablespoon each of chopped onion and parsley. 

POTATO SALAD (NO. 3). 

One pint of hot potatoes, cut in cubes, 1 cup of choped 
celery, juice of 1 small onion, 2 hard-boiled eggs, whites 
chopped fine and yolks sifted, and 1 tablespoon chopped 
parsley; season with a dash of cayenne, salt to taste. 
Mix with a French dressing. Keep on ice, and when 
ready to serve, add boiled dressing to moisten and place 
on lettuce leaves. 

WELSH RAREBIT. 

Rub the bottom of the chafing dish with a clove or 
garlic. Put in 1 round tablespoon of butter to melt, 

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pour in i gill of ale or beer, and when it begins to boil 
add Yi pound of American cheese, grated ; stir till smooth 
and creamy, and add a dash of cayenne, Y\ teaspoon 
mustard, i teaspoon celery salt. Beat 2 eggs very light 
and beat into them gradually a few tablespoons of the 
cream mixture. When they are thoroughly blended, add 
the egg mixture to the contents of the chafing dish, 
stirring constantly. Just before serving add 1 teaspoon 
each of lemon juice and Worcestershire sauce. Serve 
hot on toast. Cream may be used in place of ale. 



102 



CHAPTER V. 

Desserts, Sweet Sauces and Candy 

SURPRISE PUDDING. 

Wipe, core and pare 6 apples and sprinkle 7 teaspoons 
of sugar and 7 tablespoons water over them and bake 
until soft. Make a custard of the yolks of 3 eggs beaten 
well ; add 3 tablespoons of sugar, a speck of salt, nutmeg 
and 1 pint of scalded milk. Pour over the apples and 
bake until the custard is firm. When custard is cool, 
cover with a meringue made of the whites of the egg, 
beaten stiff, 3 tablespoons of sugar added gradually and 
a few drops of vanilla. Put in the oven and bake until a 
light brown. 

STEAMED APPLE PUDDING. 

Fill a 2 quart granite pan two-thirds full of apples, cut 
into eighths; if not juicy, add % cup of water; sprinkle 
over them a scant ]/2 cup of sugar, pinch of cinnamon; 
butter the edge of the pan and the inside of the cover. 
Cover with a biscuit crust, made of 1 pint of flour, 4 
teaspoons of baking powder, y 2 teaspoon salt, 3 table- 
spoons of butter, 2 teaspoons sugar and milk enough to 
make a soft dough. Steam 1^ hours. Serve with lemon, 
molasses or hard sauce. 

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STEAMED BLUEBERRY PUDDING. 

May be made the same as steamed apple pudding, 
sweetening the blueberries before steaming. 

STEAMED FRUIT PUDDING. 

Two and one-half cups of flour, i teaspoon of soda 
(mashed fine), J4 teaspoon salt, i saltspoon nutmeg, i 
saltspoon cinnamon, I cup of chopped suet, I cup of boiled 
and chopped raisins, I cup of currants, % cup of citron, 
i cup of milk or cold water and I cup of molasses. Mix 
in the order given and steam in a buttered mould 3 hours. 
Serve with hot sauce. 

JELLIED PEACHES. 

Dissolve Yz box of gelatine in 3/2 cup of cold water 
until soft; add 1 pint peach syrup, 1 cup of sugar, the 
rind and juice of 1 lemon, 1 cup water. Stir over the 
fire until it boils. Strain and put in the peaches, cut 
in thin slices. Pour into a mould, previously wet with 
cold water ; place on ice. Serve with soft custard. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

Remove the crusts from 4 slices of stale bread and 
soak (bread) in 1 quart of milk. Beat 2 eggs, add 1-3 
cup of sugar, 3/2 teaspoon of salt, 34 teaspoon of cin- 
namon, mace or nutmeg and 2 tablespoons of melted 
butter. Pour into the bread mixture, beat well; turn 
into a buttered pudding dish and bake 1 hour. Serve 
with hard sauce. One-half cup of raisins may be added 
if liked. They should first be cooked till soft and plump. 

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COTTAGE PUDDING. 
Cream % cup of butter, add i small teacup of sugar, 
beat until creamy, add I egg, well beaten. Mix 4 tea- 
spoons baking powder, with I pint of flour and sift into 
the first mixture ; then pour in 1 cup of sweet milk. Beat 
thoroughly and flavor with lemon or vanilla. Bake fa 
of an hour in a slow oven and serve with a hot sauce. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

Soak 1 cup of stale bread crumbs in 1 pint of cold 
milk 1 hour. Add the beaten yolks of 2 eggs and 1 
saltspoon of salt. Put 1 ounce of chocolate, *4 of a cup 
of sugar and 1 tablespoon of water in a stewpan and 
stir until smooth. Turn into the first mixture, add 1 
tablespoon of melted butter and l /2 teaspoon of vanilla. 
Bake in a slow oven about 30 minutes. When the pud- 
ing is cold, spread on the meringue, made of the beaten 
whites of the eggs and 2 tablespoons of sugar. Set the 
pudding in the oven over a pan of hot water and bake 
until light brown. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

Dissolve % of a package of gelatine in a little cold 
water, and when softened pour on 1 cup of boiling water ; 
add 1 scant cup of sugar, 34 cup of lemon juice ; let boil 
up once; strain and set away to cool: When cold and 
beginning to thicken, add the whites of 3 eggs, beaten stiff, 
and continue beating until stiff enough to keep its shape. 

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Put in a melon mould and set on ice. Serve with boiled 
custard. 

BOILED CUSTARD. 

One quart of milk, 4 or 6 eggs, 6 tablespoons of sugar, 
1 teaspoon of Jamaica rum, rose, almond, rind of 1 lemon 
or cinnamon. Scald the milk. Beat the eggs, add the 
sugar and the scalded milk. Turn all into the double 
boiler and cook until smooth and creamy or as soon as 
the froth disappears. Strain through a hair sieve into 
bowl previously wet with cold water. When cold, add 
flavoring and a pinch of salt. 

BAKED CUSTARD. 

Beat 6 eggs very light, add 1 quart of boiling milk, 6 
tablespoons of sugar, 1 teaspoon of almond essence and 
grain of salt. Strain and fill cups. Set them in a pan 
of boiling water, which must nearly reach the tops of 
cups. Cover with another pan and let stand on the 
range, where a moderate boil can be obtained. Watch 
closely until the tops of the custards are set. Remove 
cups, cover tops with powdered nutmeg or cinnamon or 
a bit of red jelly and place in a cold place. If more 
convenient, put the pan with the cups in the oven and 
cook uncovered until a spoon comes out clear. 

CARAMEL CUSTARD. 

One pint of brown sugar to 3 pints of milk. Melt the 
sugar in a frying pan, being sure it does not scorch in 
the least. Pour it slowly into the milk, which must be 

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boiling; then stir it steadily. Beat 7 eggs well, pour 
sweetened milk over them slowly. Flavor. Strain into 
cups and place in a pan of hot water and bake either on 
the top of the range or in the oven from 30 to 40 minutes 
or till firm. 

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD PUDDING. 

Scald 1 quart of milk; stir into it 2^2 ounces of 
chocolate, grated, and stir until smooth. Take from the 
fire and pour over 6 eggs, well beaten, leaving out 2 of 
the whites. Sweeten and flavor with vanilla ; it will need 
to be very sweet. Bake in a deep dish and place in a 
pan of boiling water and cook like a custard, removing 
from oven when a knife blade comes out clear. Cool and 
set on ice. Just before serving, beat the whites of 2 
eggs, add }i cup of powdered sugar and spread over the 
top. Place in the oven to brown lightly. 

CORN STARCH PUDDING. 

Scald 3 cups of milk ; dissolve j4 cup of corn starch in 
1 cup of cold milk, pour it slowly into the scalded milk, 
add 1-3 of a cup of sugar, 1 saltspoon of salt and cook 
in a double boiler for y± hour, stirring continually for first 
5 minutes, after that occasionally. Beat the whites of 
the 3 eggs stiff and add to the first mixture and remove 
from the fire ; flavor to taste. Pour into a mould, pre- 
viously wet with cold water. Turn out when cold and 
serve with a liquid sauce or preserved raspberries. 

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HARRIET PUDDING. 

Three tablespoons of tapioca, soaked in cold water until 
it has swelled enough ; then add I quart of milk and put 
into a double boiler and cook until tender ; mix the beaten 
yolks of 3 eggs, a teacup of sugar, a pinch of salt together 
and add to the boiling mixture and flavor. Pour in one- 
half into a buttered pudding dish, spread with the beaten 
whites and pour over the remainder. Serve very cold. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Take 4 large tablespoons of tapioca and soak over 
night in 1 quart of milk. Add ]/$ cup of butter, the 
beaten yolks of 4 eggs, l / 2 cup of sugar and a grated 
nutmeg. Stir the whole well together and bake in a 
deep dish 1 hour. When cool, spread the whites, beaten 
stiff, on top and place on the oven grate until it becomes 
a light brown. 

BROWN BETTY. 

Two and one-half cups of thinly sliced apples, 2 cups 
of bread crumbs, y 2 cup melted butter, y 2 cup of sugar, 
1 teaspoon of nutmeg and cinnamon mixed, ]/ 2 cup of 
boiling water. Melt butter, add crumbs, mix sugar and 
spices together. Put a layer of crumbs on the bottom 
of a pudding dish, then a layer of apples and sugar, then 
y 2 the water, and so alternate, having the crumbs on top. 
Cover and bake from 30 to 40 minutes. Remove cover 
and place on the grate to brown. Serve with cream or 
a pudding sauce. Berries or peaches may be used in 
place of the apples. 

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INDIAN MEAL PUDDING. 

Scald i quart of milk and pour it over £4 of a cup of 
indian meal. Cook in double boiler for 30 minutes ; add 
2 tablespoons of butter, a pinch of nutmeg, a generous 
speck of soda, dissolved in 2 tablespoons of cold milk 
and y 2 saltspoon of salt, 24 of a cup of N. O. molasses, 
1 egg beaten well and 2 cups of thinly sliced apples. 
Bake in a moderately hot oven for 1 hour. Serve with 
rum sauce. If Porto Rico molasses is used, add a des- 
sertspoon of sugar. 

INDIAN MEAL PUDDING (NO. 2). 

Pour enough boiling water on 2 cups of indian meal to 
wet thoroughly, add y 2 cup of butter, 1 cup of sugar, a 
pinch of salt, 2 cups of milk, y 2 cup of molasses and 1 cup 
of seeded raisins (if you wish) ; 1 teaspoon of cinnamon 
and a little nutmeg. Bake 3 hours and serve with cream. 
STRAWBERRY CUSTARD. 

Scald 1 pint of cream ; pour it over 4 eggs, well beaten, 
4 tablespoons of sugar and flavor with lemon rind. 
Cook in a double boiler until smooth and thick ; when a 
little cool, stir in y 2 ounce of gelatine, dissolved in cold 
water, stirring briskly just before pouring into moulds. 
Select large, firm red berries, put into a strainer, without 
removing hulls, and let the cold water run on them. 
Drain well; when dry, remove hulls, dip each one into 
some dissolved gelatine. Place a tin mould in a pan 
where it can remain steady; line sides and bottom with 
the strawberries ; turn in the cold custard. Place on ice 

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for several hours. Serve on a glass dish, having a border 
of whipped cream. 

FLOATING ISLAND. 

Scald I quart of milk, pour over the well-beaten yolks 
of 6 eggs, add 6 tablespoons of sugar. Cook over boiling 
water until smooth and creamy. Flavor with I teaspoon 
of Jamaica rum, rose, almond or vanilla extract, and 
pinch of salt. Place some slices of stale sponge cake or 
lady fingers in a glass dish, moisten with a little hot milk. 
Pour over the hot custard. Just before serving, beat the 
whites of the eggs stiff, add 3 tablespoons of sugar. Put 
over the custard and dot here and there with a candied 
cherry or a bit of red jelly. 

BLUEBERRY PUDDING. 

Wash and stew 1 quart of blueberries, 1 pint of cold 
water, 1 cup of sugar together or heat 1 can of blue- 
berries and sweeten to taste. Cut 4 or 5 slices of stale 
bread, butter and put in a mould and cover with the 
stewed berries. Steam 1 hour and serve with a hot 
liquid sauce. 

SNOW CREAM. (Southern recipe.) 

Put some thin slices of sponge cake on the bottom of a 
dish ; pour in wine enough to soak it. Beat up the whites 
°f 3 e Sg s verv stiff, add 2 tablespoons sifted powdered 
sugar, a glass of sweet wine and 1 pint of rich cream. 
Beat well and pour over the cake. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN PUDDING. 

Boil 1 cup of rice with 3 cups boiling water and y* 
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teaspoon salt for 5 minutes; then steam until tender 
(about y$ hour) ; add 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 saltspoon 
nutmeg. Remove and put a layer of rice in a buttered 
pudding dish, then a layer of apple sauce, flavored with 
lemon ; dot over with 1 tablespoon of butter and continue, 
alternating until dish is filled, having the apple (and 
butter) on top. Place in the oven to become a pale 
yellow. Serve either hot or cold with soft custard. 
CRACKER PUDDING. 
Three-quarters cup of sifted cracker crumbs; soak in 
l /t cup of cold water for 5 minutes. Squeeze. Beat the 
yolks of 3 eggs very light ; add Y\ cup of sugar, Y\ cup of 
melted butter, a pinch of salt, 1 quart of cold milk and 

3 ounces of grated chocolate, dissolved in milk enough to 
pour. Stir all together. Bake in a rather quick oven 
for 25 minutes. Set aside to cool and cover with a 
meringue made of the whites of eggs beaten stiff and 1 
cup of powdered sugar; put it back in the oven and 
brown slightly. 

CHOCOLATE BLANC MANGE. 
Allow 2 ounces of grated chocolate to a quart of sweet 
milk. Melt the chocolate and add the sweet milk scalded ; 
care must be taken to have it free from lumps. Dissolve 

4 heaping tablespoons corn starch in cold water to make 
a smooth paste to pour easily, and add to the chocolate 
and cook for 40 minutes or until the raw taste has entirely 
disappeared. Take from the fire, add sugar to make very 
sweet and flavor with vanilla to taste, This quantity fills 

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a 3 pint mould. Serve with plain custard or whipped 
cream. It should be smooth and free from lumps. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

Three pints of rich milk scalded and poured on 3 whole 
eggs and yolks of 3 all beaten together; add 2 cups of 
sugar and 1 heaping tablespoon of butter; flavor with 1 
teaspoon of rum or rose water. Strain over 1-3 package 
of cocoanut. Pour into a buttered pudding dish, set 
into a pan of hot water and bake slowly about 40 minutes, 
being careful not to let it whey. Beat the whites of 3 
eggs with enough powdered sugar to make it stiff; add 
a teaspoon of any flavoring. Put on upper grate of oven 
for 2 minutes. Remove and place in a cold place for 
several hours. 

PLAIN RICE PUDDING. 

Take 1-3 cup of rice, put in a saucepan, cover with 
cold water and add 1 teaspoon of salt. When it boils, 
drain off the water, rinse with cold water and drain well. 
Put into a stewpan with 2 tablespoons of sugar, i l / 2 
pints of milk, and the thin rind of 1 lemon. Bring milk 
to boiling point and then let simmer for 1 hour, stirring 
occasionally with a fork. Add 1 tablespoon of butter. 
Remove any large piece of rind and pour into a buttered 
pudding dish and bake slowly in a moderate oven for 1 
hour. 

POOR MAN'S PUDDING. 

A teacup 2-3 full of rice, 3 pints of milk, a little salt, 
coffee cup of sugar and 1 cup of raisins. Bake 3 or 4 

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hours, slowly at first. Serve hot or cold. This is creamy 
and delicious. 

SUET PUDDING. 

Two eggs, i cup of milk, y 2 cup of molasses, y 2 cup of 
finely chopped suet, y 2 teaspoon of soda (mashed fine), 
about 3^2 cups of flour, i teaspoon of spice and I tea- 
spoon of salt, i cup of chopped raisins. Stir it all together 
and steam for 3 hours. Serve with hot sauce. 

CRANBERRY PUDDING. 
Cream y 2 cup of butter. Add 1 cup of sugar, 2 eggs 
beaten light; alternately add 1 cup of milk and 3 
cups of pastry flour, mixed with 6 teaspoons of baking 
powder. Cut 1 cup of cranberry in halves, sprinkle with 
1 cup of sugar and add to the first mixture. Bake in 
either a shallow buttered pan or in gem pans ; dredge the 
top with granulated sugar and bake for 25 minutes. 
Serve with lemon or foamy sauce. 

NEW ENGLAND PLUM PUDDING. 

One pound of suet, chopped fine, Y\ pound of stale 
bread crumbs, ]/\ pound of brown sugar, the grated rind 
of 1 lemon, ]/\ pound of flour, 1 pound each of currants 
and stoned raisins, y 2 pound of citron cut in strips, y 2 
nutmeg, 1 tablespoon each of mace and cinnamon, 5 eggs, 
y 2 pound of minced orange, y 2 pint of brandy or Jamaica 
rum. Clean, wash and dry the currants and stone and 
chop the raisins. Rub the dried fruit briskly with a 
cloth, to break off any little stalks that may remain. 

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Carefully mix the dry ingredients together. Beat the 
eggs till frothy, add to them the brandy and pour them 
over the dry ingredients, mixing and beating thoroughly. 
Put in a large, well-buttered mould and steam 6 hours. 
Serve with rum, hard, or brandy sauce or vanilla ice 
cream. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. (English recipe). 

Chop very fine I pound of beet suet, mixed with 34 
cup of flour and 2 ounces each of candied orange and 
lemon peel. Wash and dry 1 pound of currants ; stone 
and chop 1 pound of sultana raisins and 1 pound of 
muscatel raisins, also chop % pound of citron. Blanch 
2 ounces each of sweet and bitter almonds. Grate 3 nut- 
megs and 1 pound of stale bread crumbs, weighed after 
grating, the grated rind and juice of 1 lemon, 24 of a 
pound of flour, 1 pound of powdered sugar, 1 tumbler 
of any tart jelly, 9 eggs, teaspoon of powder-ginger 
root, 1 tumbler of Jamaica rum. Beat eggs very light, 
add the jelly, then the suet, then a little flour, alternating 
with the other ingredients, mixed together, and lastly add 
the ginger root and salt. Beat thoroughly, using the 
hand. Butter a mould and steam for 6 hours. Serve 
with wine sauce. 

On day it is wanted, steam again for 2 hours. Turn 
out on a dish, stick in blanched and sliced almonds, put 
a sprig of holly in the center, pour a small glass of cognac 
over it and light the liquor, and serve while blazing. 

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CABINET PUDDING. 

Butter a mould and decorate sides and bottom with 
boiled seeded raisins and chopped citron; then put in a 
layer of lady fingers or sponge cake, then some fruit and 
lady fingers and so on until the mould is filled. Pour I 
pint of scalded milk on 3 eggs, well beaten ; add 3 table- 
spoons sugar and 1 saltspoon of salt and 1 teaspoon of 
flavoring. Pour over the cake and steam 1 hour for a 
2 quart mould. Serve with a hot liquid sauce. 
LEMON PUDDING. 
Three pints of milk, beaten yolks of 4 eggs, 1 cup of 
soft bread crumbs, 1 cup of sugar or sweeten to taste 
and 2 tablespoons of flour; cook the ingredients as a 
custard in a double boiler. When thick, remove from 
the fire, strain and set away to cool. When cold, add 
the juice and rind of 3 lemons, and if not flavored enough 
add more. Just before serving, add the whites of the 
eggs beaten stiff with 2 tablespoons of powdered sugar ; 
heap lightly on pudding dish and serve very cold. If 
liked, it may be placed on the upper grate of a hot oven 
to brown a golden brown. 

RICE AND STRAWBERRY PUDDING. 
Cream y 2 cup of butter, add i l / 2 cups of sugar, cream 
again and add 3 pints of strawberries. Mix together and 
put in a dish and cover with i l / 2 cups of rice. Steam for 
40 minutes and serve with a hot sauce. 
FRUIT TRIFLE. 
Beat the whites of 4 eggs till stiff, add 3 tablespoons 

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currant jelly and 2 tablespoons of raspberry jam, 
beat very light with the egg beater. Put some lady 
fingers and macaroons in a dish and pile the mixture in 
lightly. A poker may be heated and passed over the top 
to brown slightly, or it may be dotted with jelly. 
CREME AU CAFE. 

Use 3 heaping tablespoons of Java and Mocha coffee 
to 1 quart of milk. Put the milk on to boil and add the 
coffee; let it come to a full boil, then place it where it 
will simmer for 15 minutes. Beat together 6 eggs and 
add 3 tablespoons of sugar ; bring the milk once more to 
a boil, being careful not to burn ; strain it over the eggs, 
stirring vigorously. Add more sugar if liked. Strain 
into cups and bake like custard. 

PEACHES AND GELATINE. 

Soak y 2 cup of gelatine in y 2 cup of cold water ; and 1 
dozen halves of peaches ; sprinkle with 1 cup of sugar ; let 
stand for 1 hour. Then pour over all 1 cup of boiling 
water and strain. Put into a saucepan and cook until the 
gelatine is dissolved. Set it away to cool and when it 
begins to thicken, add 1 pint of rich cream, whipped stiff, 
and a pinch of soda, and stir into the gelatine, a spoonful 
at a time. Turn into a mould wet with cold water and 
set away to harden. Serve with a sauce. 

PEACH CHARLOTTE. 

Line the bottom and sides of a mould with sponge 
drops or slices of sponge cake. Pare and cut into quar- 
ters ripe peaches, sprinkle sugar over them and fill the 

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dish nearly full. Then whip i pint of sweetened cream 
and put over the fruit. Serve very cold with or without 
a boiled custard. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 
One quart of cream, beaten light, I ounce of gelatine 
dissolved in 1-3 cup of cold water. The whites of 4 
eggs beaten stiff. Put 1 cup of sugar and 1-3 cup of 
water together and boil until it threads, then pour it over 
the dissolved gelatine. Beat the cream very light, flavor, 
then add the whites of the eggs and lastly the gelatine. 
Add more sweetening if necessary. Line a mould or 
cups with lady fingers or sponge cake ; fill in with cream 
mixture. Keep on ice until ready to serve. 

ICE CREAM. 

Put 1 pint of milk on to scald with a i-inch piece of 
vanilla bean. Beat 2 eggs (or yolks of 4) very light, 
add 2 cups of sugar, 2 teaspoons of corn starch and beat 
well. Add to the boiling milk. Cook in a double boiler 
at least 20 minutes (to prevent any taste from corn 
starch), stirring often. Add a pinch of salt and, when 
cool, add 1 pint of cold milk and y 2 to 1 cup of cream. 
A larger quantity may be made by using more milk and 
sugar. Before freezing, remove the bit of pod, carefully 
scraping all the little seeds into the custard. 

RASPBERRY ICE CREAM. 

Boil 2 quarts of raspberries with 2 cups of sugar for 
10 minutes. Squeeze as much of the pulp and juice as 

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possible through a jelly bag, and add I pint of boiling 
milk to it. Freeze at once, and when almost ready to 
pack, stir in a pint of stiffly beaten cream. 
COFFEE ICE CREAM. 

Add l /± cup of very strong black coffee to Philadelphia 
ice cream, and omit vanilla flavoring. 

PHILADELPHIA ICE CREAM. 

One pint of thick cream, mixed with 3 cups of milk; 
add 1 cup of sugar, 1 tablespoon vanilla and freeze. 
FRENCH ICE CREAM. 

Put on to scald 1 pint of milk in the double boiler, with 
a piece of vanilla bean about 1 inch length. Beat the 
yolks of 4 eggs until the froth disappears; add ]/2 cup 
of sugar, 2 slightly rounding tablespoons of flour and 
mix until very light ; pour on the scalded milk and let 
it cook in the double boiler for 15 or 20 minutes, stirring 
frequently. Add a pinch of salt and pour into a bowl, 
previously wet with cold water. When cold, add 3 cups 
of cream and l / 2 cup of sugar and 1 tablespoon Madeira 
wine. Before freezing, remove the pit of pod, scraping 
all the black seeds into the custard. This makes a smooth 
and delicious ice cream, and if the milk be boiling and 
the custard allowed to cook hard the full time, there will 
be no taste of the flour. 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET. 

Take 2 or 3 very ripe pineapples, pare and grate them 
into a bowl. Put the grated pineapple on a sieve and 
press it down, to get out every drop of juice; add an 

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equal amount of boiling water and sugar to make it very 
sweet, as all things when frozen have less sweetness. 
Strain when sugar is dissolved and freeze in the usual 
manner. 

COFFEE JELLY. 

Soak i box of gelatine in I cup of cold water; when 
soft add 1^2 cups of boiling water, I pint of boiling 
coffee and 2 cups of sugar or enough to make very sweet. 
Place on stove to heat for 2 minutes ; strain into moulds ; 
put away to harden. Serve with whipped cream. 
ORANGE JELLY. 

Soak y 2 box of gelatine in y^ cup of cold water until 
soft. Add 1 cup of boiling water, juice of 1 lemon, 1 cup 
of sugar, 1 pint of orange juice and the rind of 3. Place 
over the fire to boil up once, then strain through a flannel 
bag ; turn into moulds and set away to harden. 
LEMON JELLY. 

Soak 1 box of gelatine in 1 cupful of cold water until 
dissolved. Put 1 small piece of stick cinnamon, the 
grated rind of the lemons and 1 quart of boiling water 
on to simmer for 15 minutes ; then pour over the dissolved 
gelatine, add 2 cups of sugar and 1 cup of lemon juice. 
Put over the fire to boil up once. Strain through a 
flannel bag, put into mould previously wet with cold water 
and set away to harden. 

WINE JELLY. (Southern recipe.) 

Soak 2 ounces of isinglass in cold water for 2 hours. 
Drain off that water and add 2 quarts of fresh boiling 

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water, 1^4 pounds of loaf sugar, the beaten whites of 3 
eggs, the juice of 3 lemons and the peel of 1 and spice 
to taste. Stir the whole together and boil 5 minutes ; add 

1 pint of wine. Strain through a flannel bag as often as 
may be necessary to make it clear. Pour into moulds 
previously wet with cold water, and set away to cool for 
several hours. The wine may be omitted and have plain 
jelly. 

WINE JELLY (NO. 2). 
To a package of gelatine add 1 pint of cold water and 
let it stand ^ hour; add the juice of 3 lemons and the 
rind of 1 ; 3 pints of boiling water, 2 cups of sugar. 
Set over fire and boil once ; add 1 pint of wine and strain 
through a flannel bag into moulds and place on ice. 

WINE JELLY (NO. 3). 

One box of gelatine, 1 cup of cold water, 3 cups of 
boiling water, 1 cup of sugar, 2 cups of sherry wine 
and juice of 1 lemon. Soak the gelatine 2 hours in the 
cold water. Pour the boiling water on it and stir until 
dissolved; add sugar. When cold add the lemon juice 
and wine. Strain through a flannel bag, turn into moulds 
and place in the ice chest for several hours. 
CIDER JELLY. 

Dissolve 1 box of gelatine in 1 cup of cold water for 

2 hours ; add 5 cups of boiling cider, 2 cups of sugar and 
place on the stove to boil up once. Strain through a 
flannel bag and turn into moulds. When cool, place in 
the refrigerator for several hours. 

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FRUIT JELLY. 

Soak a scant ]/ 2 box of gelatine in y 2 cup of cold water 
until soft. Add I pint of boiling water, i cup of sugar, 
the juice and grated rind of i lemon. Place over the 
fire for I minute ; then add ]/ 2 cup of Maraschino wine. 
Strain through a flannel bag. Put a layer of jelly i inch 
deep in a mould and harden it. Decorate with angelica, 
cover with jelly; when hard put in a smaller mould and 
fill the space between with jelly ; when stiff, remove the 
mould and fill the space thus made with peaches, oranges, 
candied fruit, bananas or mixed fruits. Serve with 
whipped cream. 

MERINGUES. 

Beat the whites of 6 eggs very stiff, add I pound 
finely powdered sugar and beat well. Spread sheets 
of note paper with oil, then drop the meringue mix- 
ture from a teaspoon with a quick jerk, and place 
quite a distance apart. Place the sheets in a cool oven; 
they must cook through, but not brown in the least (about 
30 minutes). When quite firm, let them cool thoroughly, 
then pack away in tin boxes; this quantity makes 26. 
When ready to use, press in the centre and fill in the 
hollow with sweetened whipped cream, flavored with a 
little wine. The meringues may be filled with bright jelly. 

CRANBERRY JELLY (NO. 1). 

Wash 1 quart of berries thoroughly ; put into a granite 

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saucepan, sprinkle over them 2 cups of granulated sugar 
and 3 tablespoons cold water. Set over the fire closely 
covered. When they start to boil, place on back of range 
where they will cook (without boiling over) for exactly 
10 minutes, without stirring; shake the saucepan occa- 
sionally. Remove the scum with a wooden or silver 
spoon and turn into a dish to cool. Cooked in this way, 
the cranberries are nearly whole but tender and the syrup 
a clear jelly. 

CRANBERRY JELLY (NO. 2). 

Wash 1 quart of cranberries thoroughly ; put into a 
granite stewpan with 1 cup of cold water and 2 cups of 
sugar ; place over a hot fire, stirring all the time until it 
boils ; then set back and let simmer for 8 or 10 minutes. 
If not sweet enough add more sugar. Mash through a 
colander into a dish and set away to harden. 

RHUBARB SAUCE. 

Wash 1 pound of rhubarb, trim off the tops and peel it. 
Cut into small pieces and put into double boiler with 1^2 
cups of sugar; cook without stirring until the sugar is 
dissolved and the fruit tender. If not sweet enough, add 
sugar to taste. Rhubarb cooked this way will be much 
nicer than when cooked to a mush. 

APPLE SAUCE. 

Pare, core and cut apples into eighths, put into cold 
water until ready to cook. Drain off the water and put 

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into a stewpan ; cover with boiling water and cook until 
soft; sweeten to taste and strain into a dish. Set away 
to cool. (Cook in a granite or porcelain stewpan and use 
a wooden spoon). 

APPLE SAUCE (NO. 2). 

Wipe, quarter and pare tart apples and put in a dish 
with enough cold water to cover. Turn into a granite 
or porcelain stewpan and boil slowly for 10 minutes, 
stirring occasionally. Then set it back and cook slowly 
until tender ; sweeten with sugar to taste. Strain through 
a coarse strainer into a glass dish. 

BAKED APPLES. 

Wipe, core and pare sour apples. Put them into a 
shallow dish or pan, fill cavities with sugar, mixed with a 
little cinnamon ; add water, allowing 2 tablespoons for 
each apple. Bake in a quick oven till soft but not broken ; 
baste frequently with the syrup. 

GINGER APPLES. 

Scrape and cut into slices % of a pound of ginger root 
and put on to boil in 1 quart of water for half an hour. 
Then add 4 pounds of sugar, the juice and yellow rind 
of 3 lemons and lastly 5 pounds of apples, pared, cored 
and cut in quarters. Boil a few of the apples at a time 
in the syrup until they are clear. When they are all 
cooked in this way, pour the syrup over them with the 
ginger root and lemon peel. Let them stand sealed up 

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2 or 3 weeks before using them. Any firm, well flavored 
fall apple will do for this purpose. 

COMPOTE OF APPLES. 

Wipe, pare, core and quarter tart apples and put in 
a porcelain dish in the oven with just enough water to 
keep from burning (about a cupful for i quart of apples). 
Add i cup of sugar, the grated rind of half a lemon 
and let the apples cook for 45 minutes, covered. Cool 
a little of the juice and, if not jellied, boil it down. Put 
the apples in the serving dish, add 1 tablespoon rum or 
brandy to the juice and pour over the apples. Set aside 
for several hours until they are thoroughly set. Serve 
with whipped cream. 

STEWED PRUNES. 

Wash carefully in several waters and soak over night 
in cold water. Drain, put them into a stewpan with 
boiling water to cover. Boil, closely covered, for 10 
minutes. Sweeten to taste and simmer until soft, but 
not broken. If the flavor of lemon is liked, a little juice 
may be added. 

WINE SAUCE, (for plum pudding.) 

Cream 34 cup of butter, add 1 cup of powdered sugar, 

1 egg, well beaten, 1 saltspoon of nutmeg or mace. Wet 

2 tablespoons of potato flour in a little cold water and 
stir into i 1 /* cups of boiling water, being careful not to 

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have it lump ; boil 10 minutes. Pour over the other mix- 
ture, stirring until well mixed ; then add l / 2 cup of wine. 

WINE SAUCE FOR PLUM PUDDING NO. 2. 

Mix 1 cup sugar and 2 tablespoons corn starch together, 
add \ l / 2 cups boiling water and boil for 15 minutes, 
stirring occasionally; add J4 cup of butter, *4 teaspoon 
of nutmeg and y 2 cup of wine. Remove from the fire 
and pour over 1 egg, well beaten, and mix well. Serve 
hot. 

WINE SAUCE. 

One cup of butter, i l / 2 cups of sugar, 1 egg, 1 table- 
spoon flour, 1 gill of wine. Cream the butter, add sugar 
gradually, then beaten egg. Wet the flour in a little cold 
water and stir into 1 cup of boiling water; boil 10 min- 
utes, then add the wine. Pour over the other mixture, 
stirring until well mixed. 

LEMON SAUCE. 
Mix 1 cup of sugar and a scant % cup corn starch or 
potato flour and the grated rind of 1 lemon together, and 
pour on 1 pint of boiling water. Cook 10 or 15 minutes, 
stirring all the time ; add the juice of 1 lemon and 2 tea- 
spoons of butter. If the sauce becomes too thick, add 
more boiling water until of the right consistency. 

RUM SAUCE. 
Two cupfuls of sugar, 1 cupful of water, 1 inch of 
stick cinnamon. Boil 10 minutes. Strain; add y 2 cup of 
Jamaica rum. 

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CLARET SAUCE. 
Boil i cup of sugar and % cup of water and i 
inch piece of stick cinnamon for 10 minutes ; strain. Cool 
and add x / 2 cup of claret. 

CREAMY SAUCE. 
Cream % cup of butter, add l / 2 cup of powdered sugar 
slowly and l / 2 teaspoon of vanilla, 2 tablespoons cream or 
wine. If it curdles, heat it to bring it together again. 

HARD SAUCE. 

Cream l / 2 cup of butter, add 1 cup of sugar slowly and 
beat until white ; flavor with 1 teaspoon vanilla and a 
speck of nutmeg. Keep on ice until very hard. 

HARD SAUCE (NO. 2). 

Cream }4 cup of butter, add 6 heaping teaspoons (}i 
cup) of powdered sugar and beat until very light; then 
add the whites of 2 eggs and beat again until light and 
frothy. Flavor with vanilla or brandy. Before serving 
sprinkle with nutmeg. 

MOLASSES SAUCE. 
Mix together 1 cup of molasses, rind and juice of 1 
lemon, 1 tablespoon butter and a speck of salt. Boil 10 
minutes. 

FOAMY SAUCE. 
Beat the whites of 2 eggs till foamy ; add 1 cup of 
white sugar ; beat well ; add }i cup of boiling milk, juice 
and grated rind of 1 small lemon, or 1 teaspoon of 
vanilla. 

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PUDDING SAUCE. 
Cream ^ cup of butter, add i cup of sugar and beat 
well, then i egg, well beaten ; flavor with nutmeg, vanilla 
or a little brandy. Set it in a warm place. 

TAFFY CANDY. 

Half fill a quart saucepan with coarse brown sugar, 
moisten with molasses, add 2 tablespoons of butter, a 
little lemon peel and juice. Let it boil and pour into 
well buttered tins. It must be thin. 

PEANUT CANDY. 

Remove the skin from shelled peanuts ; chop the nuts 
fine and fill a pan to the depth of I inch. Boil 2 pounds 
of brown sugar, 1 cup of water and ^ cup of molasses 
until it hardens. Pour the hot candy on the meat. When 
nearly cold, divide into squares. 

OLD FASHIONED MOLASSES CANDY. 

Boil the molasses until a little dropped in water will 
stretch ; but not until it becomes brittle. Pour on but- 
tered plates and leave until it stiffens. Then stretch, 
using the tips of the fingers and it will not stick unless 
butter is used. If the candy sticks, let it cool a trifle 
more. The point is to keep it light and grainy ; y 2 tea- 
spoon of soda is added for each quart of molasses while 
it is boiling; flavoring may be added if desired. 

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CREAMED WALNUTS. 

The white of i egg, an equal amount of cold water 
and i teaspoon of vanilla flavoring. Beat thoroughly 
and stir in confectioners' sugar, sifted until dough is soft 
enough to mould. Break off pieces the size wanted ; roll 
them in the palm of the hand until smooth. Put y 2 
walnut meat on each side, letting the cream show slightly 
between the meats. These may be made by using grated 
maple sugar instead of confectioners' sugar and are 
delicious. 

CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 

Put the white of I egg in a cup or glass and measure 
an equal amount of water or milk ; add I teaspoon flavor- 
ing and beat thoroughly. Beat in enough powdered sugar, 
sifted, to make a stiff dough. Mould small pieces of the 
mixture into the shape of thimbles ; butter a pan, sprinkle 
a little corn starch over it and put the cream balls in a 
cool place to harden. Melt some chocolate in a double 
boiler, and when the balls are hard, dip them in ; let drain 
and put on the pan till dry. 

TAFFY. 
One quart of roasted peanuts, shell and chopped or 
pounded very fine ; I pound of brown sugar, a teaspoon 
of butter, the strained juice of a lemon or a teaspoon 
of vinegar and a tablespoon of water, or just enough to 
dissolve the sugar when put on the fire. Boil the sugar, 

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lemon, etc., for 20 minutes, stirring to keep from burning. 
Then mix in the nuts, boil up once and pour in buttered 
pans. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

One pound of brown sugar, 1 teacup of molasses, y 2 
teacup of butter, 2 tablespoons of vinegar. Boil all 
together about 20 minutes or till it hardens in cold water. 
Then pour thin on buttered tins, cutting in squares while 
still warm. 

CARAMEL. 

One large cup of molasses, a teacup of sugar, 1 cup 
of milk, 1 heaping tablespoon of butter, a pinch of 
salt, x /\ of a pound of chocolate, cut or scraped fine. Boil 
all together half an hour or until it hardens when dropped 
in cold water ; then pour on buttered tins and, as it cools, 
cut into small squares. 

FUDGE. 

Two cups of sugar, 2 squares chocolate cut fine, 
Yz cup of milk, 4 tablespoons of butter or butter the size 
of an egg. Boil 7 minutes (counting from the time it 
begins to boil). Flavor with vanilla and beat a few 
minutes after taking off the stove. Pour into hot greased 
pans and, after it cools, mark in squares. 

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CHAPTER VI. 

Pastry and Cake 

HINTS ABOUT PASTRY. 

A marble slab is an ideal arrangement for rolling pastry. 
The following rules are necessary to insure a perfect pie : 

First. Pound the pastry well until it is filled with air 
spaces. 

Second. Always put in a cool place to chill. 

Third. Rub the undercrust with the white of an egg 
before putting in the mixture, to prevent it from soaking 
into the pastry. 

Fourth. Place it in a hot oven. 

Fifth. Place on the floor of the oven, later put on top 
to brown. 

The secret of good pastry is to have it rich, without 
being greasy ; and flaky, without being brittle. 

Pastry flour is a necessity and should be sifted before 
using. 

Work it as quickly and lightly as possible. 

% PASTRY. 

Three cups of flour, }% cup of butter, ^ cup lard or 
drippings, I teaspoon of baking powder and a pinch of 
salt. Sift flour, salt and baking powder together; rub in 
butter and lard ; mix quite stiff with cold water. Pat 
and roll out on a floured board, rolling from you. 

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PASTRY FOR ONE PIE. 

Sift twice I heaping cup of pastry flour, Ya teaspoon 
of salt, J4 teaspoon of baking powder ; rub in Ya cup of 
butter and Ya cup of lard until it looks mealy. Add about 
Ya cup of cold water (using more if needed). Mix with 
a knife, then beat and turn out on a floured board and 
pat with rolling pin until light and smooth. Divide in 2 
parts and roll to fit the plate. 

MOCK CHERRY PIE. 

One cup cranberries chopped, y* cup of raisins 
chopped, Yz cup of water, I cup of sugar, I teaspoon of 
vanilla, 2 tablespoons of flour; Ya cup of currants may 
be added if liked. Bake with two crusts. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 
Three-quarters cup of rolled crackers, 3 pints of 
chopped apples, Yz pound of raisins, y 2 pound of cur- 
rants, ]/\ pound of citron, Y\ cup of' melted butter; 3 eggs, 
beaten well, Y2 cup of molasses, ^2 cup of cider, 2 table- 
spoons of whiskey, 1 teaspoon each of cloves, allspice, 
nutmeg, cinnamon and mace, 1 saltspoon of salt. Bake 
as mock cherry. 

COLONIAL PUMPKIN PIE. 

Cut up a dark yellow pumpkin into strips and steam 
until soft. When done strain through a sieve. To 2 
quarts of pumpkin add 2 quarts of milk and 12 eggs, well 
beaten, and a grating of nutmeg. Fill pie plates with 

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undercrust and fill with pumpkin, scalding hot. Bake I 
hour if pies are deep. (The more eggs used, the less time 
it takes to bake.) 

PUMPKIN PIE (NO. 2). 
Two cups strained pumpkin, add 1 pint hot milk, 1 
saltspoon of nutmeg and cinnamon, y 2 teaspoon salt, y 2 
cup of sugar. Cool slightly; add 2 eggs, well beaten, 1 
tablespoon of whiskey. Line a plate with paste and fill 
with pumpkin. Bake in a moderate oven Y\ of an hour. 

LEMON PIE. 

Juice of 2 lemons, the yolks of 4 eggs, 9 large 
spoonfuls of sugar, 2-3 of a tumbler of milk, a pinch of 
salt. After the pies are cool, make a meringue of the 
beaten whites and add 4 tablespoons of sugar. 

SQUASH PIE. 

Take 1 quart of steamed and sifted squash; add 3 eggs, 
well beaten, and 1 quart of milk, 1 tablespoon flour or 
sifted cracker crumbs, 1 tablespoon of butter, 1 tablespoon 
molasses and sugar to taste. Flavor with nutmeg, ginger 
or allspice. Fill pie plates with crust and bake 1 hour. 

CUSTARD PIE. 

Beat 3 eggs slightly, add 3 tablespoons of sugar, a pinch 
of salt, 1 saltspoon of mace. Pour oh 3 cups of hot milk. 
Line a deep pie plate with paste and strain the custard 

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into it. Bake slowly, and when a knife blade comes out 
clean, it is done. 

BRISTOL PIE 
Take some sweet, mellow apples, pare and grate. To 
a pint of the grated pulp add I pint of milk, 2 eggs, well 
beaten, 2 tablespoons butter, melted, the grated peel of a 
lemon and ^ wineglass of brandy. Sweeten to taste 
with brown sugar. Bake pies in a deep plate without 
upper crust. If preferred the apples may be stewed as 
for apple sauce and the other ingredients added. 

APPLE PIE. 
Pare 4 or 5 apples, core and cut into quarters and put 
into stewpan, with water to cover ; add 1 cup of sugar 
and a little nutmeg; when soft, remove and strain through 
a coarse strainer. When cold, fill pie plate, previously 
lined with plain paste ; dot over with 1 teaspoon butter ; 
wet the edges, cover, with paste rolled out very thin. Bake 
in a steady moderate oven 1 hour. 

HUCKLEBERY OR BLUEBERRY PIE. 

Pick over the berries and wash. Use about 3 cups 
fruit for each pie. Heap fruit in center. Sprinkle with 
1 teaspoon flour and add sugar to taste; dot over with 
bits of butter and bake in a deep pie plate with 2 crusts 
for about 45 minutes. 

DRIED APPLE OR PEACH PIE. 

Wash and soak in lukewarm water over night ; when 

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needed drain off the water; line a deep pie plate with 
paste, wet the edge and put on a rim; fill with fruit, 
sprinkle with sugar and a grating of nutmeg; dot over 
with i heaping tablespoon butter; cover with crust and 
bake until apples are soft. 



ELDERBERRY PIE. 

Line a plate with pastry and fill with ripe elderberries ; 
sprinkle with a generous 1-3 cup of white sugar, add 
2 tablespoons of vinegar, and then sift over 1 rounding 
tablespoon of flour or corn starch and dot with 1 table- 
spoon of butter. Cover with an upper crust of pastry 
with openings in centre for steam to escape, and bake in 
a moderate oven about 1 hour. 



RHUBARB PIE. 

Peel the rhubarb, cut into small pieces and put on to 
cook in a stewpan, with sugar to taste ; flavor with mace 
and 1 tablespoon butter. Set away to cool. Line pie 
plate with plain paste; wet rim; add rhubarb; lay paste 
on to form diamond shape spaces ; put a rim around and 
moisten with beaten egg or use an upper crust instead. 

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PUMPKIN PIE (NO. 3). 

Mix together 2 coffeecups of steamed and strained 
pumpkin, ^ CU P of butter, 6 beaten eggs, I cup of sugar, 
i teaspoon of nutmeg or mace, y^ saltspoon of salt. Pour 
2 cups of scalded milk over 1-3 cup of finely sifted 
cracker crumbs ; add to the first mixture ; then add ^4 cup 
of whiskey and beat thoroughly. Line a plate with paste 
and fill with pumpkin. Bake in a moderate oven. 



MINCE MEAT. 

Four pounds of lean meat, 2 pounds of suet, 8 pounds 
of apples, 4 pounds of sugar, 2 pounds of the best raisins 
and other fruit as you wish (currants and citron), 1 pint 
of molasses, 1 quart of cider, 1 teacup of brandy, 4 nut- 
megs, 1 tablespoon each of allspice, mace, cinnamon and 
cloves. Put meat and suet in pot and cover with boiling 
water and cook suet only one-half the time (about I 
hour). Chop the meat and suet fine; add the chopped 
apples, the raisins stoned and cut, also the other fruit, the 
sugar, molasses, cider, salt and spices. Simmer for 2 
hours. When cool, add the brandy. 

MINCE MEAT (Creole recipe). 

Boil 1 fresh tongue (about 7 pounds), skin and mince 
fine. Chfljjjjfe pounds of fresh beef suet, freeing it thor- 

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oughly from all fibre; stone 4 pounds of raisins; 
wash and dry the same quantity of currants and 1 pound 
of citron, cut very fine, 1 pound of brown sugar, a 
cup of Porto Rico molasses, 1 heaping tablespoon each 
of ground cinnamon, mace and allspice, l / 2 tablespoon of 
cloves, a grated nutmeg and 2 cups of cider. Put all the 
ingredients into a large stone crock and set in a moderate 
oven for 1% hours, stirring several times. Then take 
from oven and pour in enough of either brandy or 
whiskey (or, if preferred, Jamaica rum may be added) 
to make the mixture very soft ; if on hand, a cup of pre- 
served quinces, will add greatly; mix vigorously with 
a wooden spoon. Cover the crock closely and set away 
to mature from 2 to 6 weeks. If it dries out during that 
period, add a little liquor from time to time. When ready 
to make into pies, add apples, allowing 3 juicy apples to 
each pint of mince meat. 

HINTS ON CAKE MAKING. 

These are some of the essentials necessary — good 
materials, fresh eggs, best butter, pastry flour, pow- 
dered, fine granulated or light brown sugar. In winter, 
the eggs should not be cold, but put in a warm place ; in 
summer, chill them with the coldest water. The flour, 
heated, either by placing where the sun will shine on it 
or putting it in a bag and placing it in the oven where it 
will heat through, then sift twice. 

Sugar should be sifted and dried, but not made hot. 
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Do not make the batter too stiff. 

Make as soon after breakfast as possible (unless a 
gas oven be used), as then the fire is at its best. 

Use the hand for final beating. 

In beating eggs, do not leave off when the eggs become 
foamy, as they are then only beginning to be light, but 
continue beating until the froth and bubbles have dis- 
appeared and the surface is smooth. 

The secret of making good cake is to beat it thoroughly 
after all ingredients have been put in. 

In all sorts of sponge cake mixture or cakes made 
without butter, flour must always go in last, and 
be folded in slowly and lightly, for if the flour is stirred 
in hard, the cake will be tough and leathery. Sponge cake 
when cut should look coarse grained and rough. 

In baking, cake may be moved during the first quarter, 
but not afterwards. 

Sprinkle a little flour on a piece of white paper and lay 
it on the oven floor. If the flour browns without burning 
in 5 minutes the oven is right for all cake and bread, 
excepting sponge and pound cake, when it should turn 
yellow. 

To bake cake, divide the time into quarters. In the 
first quarter, the cake begins to rise ; in the second quarter, 
it continues rising and begins to brown; in the third, it 
continues to brown, and in the last quarter, it finishes 
browning and shrinks from the pan. To remove the 

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cake, stand the pan on its side, so as to let the weight of 
the cake help it out. 

Never slam the oven door, open and close it gently. 

To slice fruit cake without crumbling, use a very sharp, 
thin knife blade, cutting when needed into thick slices, to 
be afterwards cut into desired size. 

CREAM CAKE. 
Two cups water, I cup butter, 2 cups flour, 6 eggs. 
Boil butter and water together and stir in the flour dry ; 
when it boils remove from the fire to cool, then add the 
eggs without beating. When well mixed, drop by table- 
spoons on a buttered pan and bake in oven that is mod- 
erately hot for 25 minutes. When cool, split and fill 
with cream and sprinkle powdered sugar on top. 

FILLING FOR CREAM CAKES. 

To 1 pint of scalded milk, stir in 2 tablespoons of corn 
starch, dissolved in 2 tablespoons of cold water, and cook 
3 minutes. Beat 2 eggs, add 1 cup of sugar, 1 heaping 
tablespoon of butter and add to the first mixture ; stir 
and cook 15 minutes in double boiler. Flavor. 

CREAM CAKE (NO. 2). 
One and one-half cups sugar, 5 eggs, 2 cups flour, 
2 teaspoons baking powder. Beat yolks of eggs very 
light ; add sugar, then the flour, to which has been added 
the baking powder, add flavoring. 

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CREAM FILLING. 

Scald i pint of milk. Beat 2 eggs very light, add ^ 
cup of sugar, 2 heaping teaspoons flour and beat well 
until smooth. Pour the scalded milk over the mixture ; 
return to the double boiler and stir all the time till it 
thickens. Put it to cool; then flavor with vanilla or 
lemon. 

CREAM CAKES (NO. 3). 
Beat yolks of 4 eggs, add 1 cup of sugar, then the 
well-beaten whites, and lastly I cup of flour, sifted, with 
a pinch of salt and 1 teaspoon of vanilla. Bake in round, 
shallow pans. 

FILLING. 

One pint of milk, scalded, 2 well-beaten eggs, 2 heaping 
teaspoons of flour, mixed with 1 cup of sugar ; add this 
to the egg and stir all together. Add mixture to the milk 
and stir all the time until it thickens. When cool, flavor 
with lemon, vanilla or almond. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Six eggs, 2 cups of sugar, 2 cups of flour and 1 full 
tablespoon of cold water, 1 teaspoon flavoring. Beat the 
yolks of the eggs and water together till light colored, 
then add the sugar and flavoring; cut in the well-beaten 
whites and lastly fold in the flour and put it at once into 
a moderate oven to bake for about 40 minutes. 

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POUND CAKE. 
Cream i cup of butter, add 2 cups of sugar, then the 
yolks of six eggs, well beaten, 1 saltspoon of mace ; add 
2 cups of flour and 2 teaspoons baking powder, mixed 
together, and lastly the whites beaten stiff and dry. Bake 
in a paper-lined cake pan in a moderately hot oven for 40 
minutes. 

POUND CAKE. (No. 2.) 

One pound of butter, 1 pound of sugar, 1 pound of 
flour, 12 eggs, y 2 teaspoon mace, mixed with grated rind 
of 2 oranges and 2 tablespoons each of brandy and 
wine or the juice of y 2 orange. Cream the butter, add 
the sugar slowly, beating well ; then the well-beaten yolks 
of the eggs and flour, alternately; the mace and flavor- 
ing, then the whites beaten stiff. Beat vigorously for 5 
minutes. Bake in a slow oven for \ x /z hours. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Beat yolks of 4 eggs until lemon color, add 1 cup of 
sugar, then the well-beaten whites and 1 cup of flour, a 
pinch of salt, 1 teaspoon vanilla. Beat well. Bake in 
round tins. 

LIGHTNING CAKE. 

Sift together 1 cup of sugar, 1% cups of flour, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder. Into a measuring cup put % cup 
melted butter ; drop in 2 eggs, without beating, and fill 
cup with milk. Add this to dry ingredients and beat well ; 

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add y 2 teaspoon of vanilla. Bake either in layer or little 
cakes. Frost. 

STRAWBERRY SPONGE CAKE. 

Beat yolks of 3 eggs until light; add I cup of sugar 
gradually, beating until creamy; then 3 tablespoons 
of hot water and I teaspoon of vanilla. Cut and fold in 
1 cup of flour, mixed with 2 teaspoons of baking powder. 
Bake in a low tube pan from 25 to 40 minutes, according 
to size of pan. Cool ; frost top and sides with boiled 
frosting and decorate with large strawberries. Just before 
serving, fill hollow with whipped cream, sweetened and 
flavored with strawberry juice. This should be eaten the 
day it is made. 

STRAWBERRY SPONGE CAKE. (No. 2). 
Beat yolks of 3 eggs until light ; add 1 cup of sugar 
gradually, beating until creamy ; then 3 tablespoons 
of hot water and 1 tablespoon of vinegar. Mix and sift 
1 cup of flour with 2 teaspoons of baking powder, a pinch 
of salt and nutmeg, and add to the first mixture ; beat 
until smooth. Fold in the whites of the eggs, beaten stiff 
and dry. Turn into two greased pans and bake in 
a moderately quick oven 20 minutes. Cool. Cut the 
strawberries in halves, sprinkle with sugar and let stand 
covered for y 2 hour. Put the strawberries between and 
on top of cake, and dot over with a meringue made of 
the whites of 2 eggs beaten stiff and 2 tablespoons of 
powdered sugar and y 2 teaspoon of vanilla. Put in a 

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slow oven for 2 minutes to dry. Whipped cream may be 
used in place of meringue. 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE. 

Cream y 2 cup of butter, add 1 cup of sugar, 1 egg, 
beaten light ; mix 2 heaping cups of flour and 4 teaspoons 
baking powder together, and add alternately with 1 
cup of milk to the first mixture, and flavor with 1 tea- 
spoon vanilla. Bake in layer pans in a moderate oven 
y 2 hour. Wash and hull some strawberries, mash and 
sweeten to taste, and spread between layers. Frost top 
with plain frosting and cover with whole strawberries ; 
sprinkle with sugar. 

GOLD CAKE. 

Cream y 2 cup butter, add 1^2 cups of sugar, the beaten 
yolks of 6 eggs, y 2 teaspoon of flavoring; \y 2 cups flour, 
y 2 cup of corn starch, 2 teaspoons of cream of tartar, 
y 2 teaspoon of soda, sifted together, and 1 cup of milk. 
Bake in a loaf pan in a moderate oven. 

DROP CAKES. 

Cream y 2 cup of butter, add 1 cup of sugar, 1 egg 
beaten very light, 1 cup of sour milk or cream, y 2 tea- 
spoon of soda or enough more to make the milk taste 
sweet, 1 teaspoon of flavoring. Flour enough to make a 
stiff batter (about 2^ cups). Bake on a buttered sheet 
10 or 15 minutes, Caraway seeds may be added. 

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ORANGE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, yolks of 5 eggs, % cup water, 2 cups 
of flour, 4 teaspoons of baking powder, whites of 4 eggs, 
rind and juice of 1 orange. Mix in the order given and 
bake in round tins; ft teaspoon soda and 1 rounding tea- 
spoon of cream of tartar may be used in place of baking 
powder. 

FILLING. 
White of 1 egg, juice and rind of I orange, made stiff 
with sugar. Spread between cakes and frost with plain 
frosting, flavored with orange juice. 

LADY BALTIMORE CAKE. (Charleston, S. C, recipe.) 

Cream 1 cup of butter, add gradually 2 cups sugar 
and beaten yolks of 7 eggs; beat well. Sift together 
ift. cups of flour and 3 generous teaspoons baking pow- 
der; add to the first mixture, alternately with 1 cup of 
milk. Beat thoroughly for a few minutes, add I teaspoon 
of almond flavoring, then fold in the well-beaten whites 
of eggs. Bake in 3 layer cake pans. 

FILLING AND FROSTING. 
Dissolve 3 cups of granulated sugar in 1 cup of boiling 
water and cook until the syrup threads, about 3 inches in 
length. Then pour on in a fine stream over the whites 
of 3 eggs, beaten stiff, and beat constantly. To this 
frosting add 1 cup of raisins, chopped fine, 1 cup of 
chopped nut meats (pecans preferred), and 1 teaspoon 
of vanilla. . > 

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New England Cook Book 



NUT CAKE. 
Cream I cup of butter, add 2 cups of sugar and beat 
well. Beat 3 large eggs (yolks and whites separately) 
and add yolks to first mixture. Sift 3 cups of flour and 
4 teaspoons of baking powder together, add alter- 
nately, with 24 cup of milk to the first mixture, and beat 
well. Cut in the beaten whites, add 1 teaspoon flavor- 
ing and 1 cup of any kind of nuts, broken into pieces, and 
% teaspoon salt. Bake about 40 minutes. Frost with a 
boiled frosting and decorate with nuts. 

QUEEN CAKE. 

Beat 1 cup of butter to a cream, add 2 cups of sugar 
gradually, beating it all the time. Sift and mix together 
2y 2 cups of flour, ]/ 2 cup of corn starch, 4 teaspoons of 
baking powder; add I cup of milk alternately with the 
flour to the first mixture. Beat the whites of 8 eggs to a 
very stiff froth, and add them slowly ; when well mixed 
add 1 teaspoon of vanilla and a tablespoon of wine. 
Bake in two layers in cake tins which are lined with 
buttered paper. Bake in moderately hot oven for 15 
minutes. This may be cut in squares and frosted with 
Caramel Icing or Mocha Filling. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Cream 1 cup of butter, add gradually 2 cups of sugar, 
the beaten yolks of 5 eggs. Mix 3 cups of flour with 4 
teaspoons of baking powder, add 1 scant cup of milk 

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alternately with the flour. Cut in the whites of 3 eggs, 
beaten stiff and dry. Add 1 teaspoon vanilla. Bake in 
tins and frost with Chocolate Frosting. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. (No. 2.) 

Cream y 2 cup of butter, add 1 cup sugar and 2 eggs, 
well beaten; mix 2 cups of flour and 3 teaspoons of 
baking powder together, and add alternately to the first 
mixture with / 2 cup of milk, flavor with 1 teaspoon 
vanilla and add ]/ A square of chocolate, melted. Bake in 
round tins and frost with white frosting. 

ROBERT E. LEE CAKE. 

Nine eggs, 2 cups sugar, 2 cups flour, sifted twice, 
with a scant ]/ 2 teaspoon of baking powder. Beat the 
yolks very light, add the sugar and beat well; then add 
the whites, beaten stiff, and lastly the flour and juice of 
1 lemon. Bake in jelly cake tins about 15 minutes. 

When cold, spread each layer with the following filling: 
Strain the grated rind and juice of 2 oranges and 1 lemon 
through a fine sieve, into a pound of pulverized sugar. 
Add to this 1 grated cocoanut and white of 1 egg, beaten 
light. This recipe makes 2 cakes of 3 layers each, and is 
delicious. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Whites of 11 eggs, i 1 /* cups granulated sugar, 1 cup of 
flour, 1 level teaspoon of cream of tartar. Beat eggs 
until they are stiff. Then add sugar and beat; add 

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New England Cook Book 



Yz teaspoon of flavoring. Sift flour and cream of tartar 
4 times and add last. Bake i hour in a slow oven ; when 
it begins to brown, cover with a buttered paper. Do 
not move whilst in the oven. Put a pinch of salt in the 
eggs before beating. 

CUP CAKE. 

Cream i cup of butter and 2 cups of sugar together 
and beat well ; add 4 eggs well beaten, then 1 cup of milk 
and 3 cups of flour, sifted and mixed with 3 slightly 
rounding teaspoons of baking powder ; flavor with nut- 
meg. One pound of currants may be added if liked. Bake 
in a moderately hot oven and frost with chocolate frost- 
ing. This may be baken in individual tins. 

SPANISH CAKE. 

Cream 1 cup of butter, add slowly 2 cups sugar and beat 
well, then add the beaten yolks of 4 eggs ; mix 4 teaspoons 
baking powder with 3 cups of flour, 1 teaspoon of 
nutmeg and 1 tablespoon grated orange rind ; add this 
alternately to the first mixture with I cup of milk, then 
the beaten whites and bake in sheets and cover with 
caramel frosting. 

SPICE CAKE. 

One egg, 2-3 cup of molasses, 2-3 cup sugar, y 2 cup 

of melted butter, 1 cup of milk, 2]/ 2 cups flour, 1 heaping 

teaspoon soda, 1 even teaspoon of cream of tartar, y 2 

teaspoon each of cloves, allspice, nutmeg, ginger, cin- 

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New England Cook Book 



namon and mace, 2 tablespoons of vinegar. Mix in the 
order given and bake either in round pan or gem pans for 
20 minutes. 

DAYTON CAKE. 

Cream i cup of butter, add 2 cups of sugar, yolks of 
3' large eggs, 3 cups of flour mixed with 4 teaspoons of 
baking powder, 2-3 cup of milk, 1 teaspoon of lemon 
flavoring, whites of the eggs beaten stiff. Bake in a 
moderate oven. 

SILVER CAKE. 

One-half cup of butter, i]/ 2 cups of sugar, \ l / 2 cups 
flour, l / 2 cup of corn starch 2 (round) teaspoons cream 
of tartar, l / 2 teaspoon soda, l / 2 cup milk, whites of 6 
eggs and l / 2 teaspoon of almond or rose flavoring. Mix 
in the order given, putting soda and cream of tartar in 
flour and adding milk and flour alternately, lastly adding 
whites beaten stiff aand flavoring. Bake in a moderate 
oven until cake shrinks from the pan. 

NEOPOLITAN CAKE. 

Cream 1 cup of butter, add 2 cups of sugar, yolks of 
3 eggs beaten light, 1 cup of milk, 3 cups of flour, sifted 
with 4 teaspoons of baking powder, and the whites of 3 
eggs. Divide the dough into 4 equal parts. Have first 
part color of dough ; color second part with pistachio ; 
third with melted chocolate ; fourth with pink coloring. 
Use extract of almond for first and second parts, vanilla 

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for chocolate part, rose for pink part. When all are 
baked, lay first a chocolate, then a light one, then a pink 
and lastly a green one. Put together with lemon jelly 
made as follows: Beat I egg, add I cup of water and 
the grated rind and juice of i lemon. Pour this slowly 
on 2 tablespoons of corn starch or potato flour, mixed 
with i cup of sugar. Cook in a saucepan till it is smooth 
like cream. Frost with plain white frosting. 

FRUIT CAKE. (Creole recipe.) 
Brown I pound of sifted flour lightly, without the least 
sign of a scorch. Cream i pound of powdered sugar^fc*^ 
and beat until very white and creamy ; then add the 
beaten yolks of 10 eggs, the stiffly beaten whites alter- 
nating with a sift-in of the flour. Have ready I pound 
of stoned raisins, I pound of currants, y 2 pound of citron, 
cut very fine ; sprinkle with a little of the flour and add 
to the batter ; then add a teaspoon each of cinnamon, 
cloves, mace and allspice, 2 grated nutmegs, 2 ounces 
each of candied orange and lemon peel, a handful of 
dried cherries, % pound each of almonds and pecans 
(weighed after shelling), 1 wineglass of sherry, 1 wine- 
glass of brandy, 1 wineglass of white wine. This will have 
to be mixed and beaten for a long time, using the hand 
instead of a spoon. Put in deep buttered pans and bake 
in a slow oven for 4 hours. It should not be cut until 
cold, and must be handled carefully when warm, as then 
it breaks easily. 

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FEATHER CAKE. 
Cream y* cup of butter (good measure), add 2 cups 
of sugar, cream until very light ; add the well-beaten yolks 
of 3 eggs, and 1 teaspoon of flavoring; mix and sift 4 
teaspoons baking powder, with 3^2 cups of flour. Add 
to the first mixture, alternately, with 1 cup of milk, lastly 
the beaten whites. Beat well and bake in a shallow pan. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

Cream 24 of a cup of butter, add 2 cups of powdered 
sugar and beat well. Sift 1 rounding teaspoon of cream 
of tartar and ^ teaspoon of soda, with 3 cups of flour ; 
add alternately with 1 cup of milk, then add the well- 
beaten whites of 4 eggs, lastly 1 teaspoon of almond 
or lemon extract. Bake in a tube pan or in layers. Four 
level teaspoons of baking powder may be used in place 
of cream of tartar and soda. 

PORK CAKE. 

Chop 1 pound salt pork very fine, add 4 coffee cups 
brown sugar, 2 cups molasses, 2 cups strong coffee, 6 
eggs well beaten, 2 teaspoons mace, 3 heaping teaspoons 
cloves, 4 nutmegs grated, essence of lemon to taste, 1 
pound each of currants, raisins and citron chopped fine 
and 6 cups of flour sifted with 4 rounding teaspoons 
cream of tartar and 2 level teaspoons soda. Bake full 
3 hours in a moderate oven. 

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COMPOSITION CAKE. 

Two cups of butter, 4 cups of sugar, 6 eggs, 1 cup of 
sour milk, y 2 cup of molasses, y 2 cup of brandy, 6 cups 
of flour, 1 teaspoon saleratus, 2 pounds of raisins, 
chopped, 2 pounds of currants and 1 pound of citron 
(chopped fine), 1 spoonful each of cloves, cinnamon and 
2 or 3 nutmegs. Beat the butter, add the sugar, grad- 
ually, the well-beaten eggs, the spice and brandy. Dis- 
solve the soda in the milk and add to the beaten mixture. 
Then add the flour and lastly the fruit. Bake 2 hours 
in well buttered pans in a moderate oven. This recipe 
may be halved and, if much fruit is not liked, use only 
half the quantity. 

DUTCH APPLE OR DRIED APPLE FRUIT CAKE. 

Soak 2 cups of dried apples over night in cold water 
to cover; in the morning put them on to simmer with 
i/^ cups of molasses until soft — about 2 hours. When 
cold, add 1 cup of butter, 2 eggs, beaten light, 2 cups of 
sugar, 1 cup of milk, 5 cups of flour, to which has been 
added 1 teaspoon soda ; beat well for 2 or 3 minutes. 
Bake in a steady oven for at least 30 minutes. This 
quantity makes two good sized panfuls and is a delicious 
and inexpensive cake. A handful of raisins stewed for 
a few minutes may be added if liked. 

GINGER BREAD. 
Cream y 2 cup of butter, add 1 cup of sugar and beat 
well; then add 2 eggs, beaten light, 1 cup of molasses, 

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to which has been added I teaspoon of soda. Mix I 
teaspoon cinnamon and i tablespoon ginger, with 3 cups 
of sifted flour ; add this alternately to the first mixture, 
with 1 cup of sweet milk. (If necessary add from */$ 
to y 2 cup more of flour.) Pour into shallow pans and 
bake in a moderately hot oven. Cover between and on 
top with caramel frosting. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

Four teacups of flour, 2 cups of molasses, 2 cups of 
buttermilk, 1 cup of thick cream, l / 2 cup of butter, 3 eggs, 
1 tablespoon white ginger and 1 dessertspoon of saleratus. 
Warm the butter and molasses together; when soft add 
flour, cream, beaten eggs and ginger ; dissolve the saleratus 
in the buttermilk and stir it quickly into the other ingre- 
dients. Put it immediately into shallow pans and bake 
in a rather quick oven. 

HOT WATER GINGER BREAD. 

One cup of molasses, ^4 cup of butter and drippings, 
melted, 1 generous teaspoon of soda, dissolved in 1 scant 
cup of boiling water, 1 teaspoon of ginger and y 2 tea- 
spoon of cinnamon, and flour enough to make a very thin 
batter. Bake in a shallow pan or gem pans in a moder- 
ately hot oven for 20 minutes. Half coffee and half 
water may be used if flavor is liked. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Put 1 pint of risen milk bread dough in a mixing bowl, 

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add 2 eggs, well beaten, i cup of sugar, 1-3 of a cup of 
melted butter and a saltspoon of nutmeg, and beat it well 
into the dough, using the hand to mix with; add more 
flour if necessary to have a dough soft enough to roll out. 
Roll, cut out, fry in deep fat, hot enough for the dough 
to rise at once. Drain as for crullers. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 

One pint of milk, ]/ 2 pint of home made yeast or y 2 
yeast cake, 2 cups of light brown sugar, 2-3 of a cup of 
melted butter and lard mixed in equal parts, 3 eggs, 3 
grated nutmegs, 1 teaspoon salt ; make into a soft dough. 
Scald the milk, add the salt; when lukewarm add the 
yeast and the 3 cups of flour. Let rise over night ; in 
the morning add all the other ingredients; do not have 
the dough stiff enough to stand ; let rise in a warm place, 
then take a little dough at a time on the board, roll out 
about an inch thick; then roll in the hand till it will not 
crack; then put on a floured board, and after one rises 
turn over and let rise again. Use a long knitting needle 
to prick with in frying them. Drain, and when partly 
cooled, sprinkle with sugar ; when cooler, add more. 

SOUR MILK DOUGHNUTS. 

Three eggs, beaten light; add 6 tablespoons of sugar, 
1 heaping tablespoon butter, melted, l / 2 cup of sour milk, 
in which y 2 teaspoon soda has been dissolved, 1 nutmeg, 
grated, and flour enough to make a soft dough to roll 
out. (Mix the dough a little soft at first.) Have the 

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board well floured; cut into any shape and fry in the 
usual manner. 

CRULLERS. 

One-half pound of butter, ^ pound of powdered sugar, 
6 eggs, cinnamon and mace to taste, enough flour to 
make a paste. Cream butter and sugar, beat the eggs 
light (white and yolks separately) and beat all together; 
add spices and flour enough to make a dough soft enough 
to handle. Roll out thin and cut into fancy shapes, and 
fry in plenty of hot fat. Drain, by plunging into a 
saucepan of rapidly boiling water, and remove at once. 
Sprinkle with powdered sugar and cinnamon. 

HERMITS. 

Cream y 2 cup butter, add iy 2 cups brown sugar and 
cream again; then add 2 eggs well beaten. Sift 1 cup 
flour with 1 teaspoon each of soda, cinnamon, cloves 
and nutmeg and add to the first mixture with % cup 
milk. Dredge l /\ cup chopped raisins and l /\ cup 
chopped currants with flour and stir into the mixture. 
Add more flour if needed. Roll out thin, cut in rounds 
and bake in a hot oven 10 minutes. 

NUT WAFERS. 
Cream y> cup of butter, add gradually 1 cup of pow- 
dered sugar, y 2 cup of milk, adding drop by drop ; 1% cups 
of bread flour, y 2 teaspoon of lemon or almond flavoring. 
Spread very thin on the bottom of an inverted bread 

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pan, buttered; mark in squares and sprinkle with any 
kind of nuts chopped fine. Bake in a moderate oven 
from 5 to 8 minutes. Roll in cornucopia shape while 
warm. Set the pan on the back of the stove and roll 
quickly as they become brittle. These are delicious 
served with ice cream. 

SAND TARTS. (Southern recipe.) 

i J4 pounds of brown sugar, i l / 2 pounds of flour, I 
pound of butter, 2 eggs, I pound of almonds. Cream 
butter and sugar together. Beat well I whole egg and 
the yolk of another, and add to the butter and sugar; 
stir the flour in gradually. Chill, toss on a floured board 
and roll very thin; cut out, lay on buttered tins, brush 
with white of egg, unbeaten, and decorate with almonds 
split in halves. Sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon, in 
the proportion of i tablespoon of sugar and 54 teaspoon 
cinnamon. Bake in a moderately hot oven about 8 
minutes. These tarts will keep a year. 

COOKIES. 

Cream I cup of butter, add 2 cups sugar, 2 eggs, well 
beaten, i tablespoon of milk, l / 2 teaspoon each cloves 
and nutmeg, 4 teaspoons baking powder, mixed with 4 
cups of flour, i l / 2 cups of cocoanut. Mix soft enough 
to be handled easily, roll out thin, and bake in a hot 
oven 10 minutes. 

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COOKIES. (No 2.) 

One cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, 3 eggs, 1 cup of 
sour milk, 1 teaspoon of soda, dissolved in a little of the 
milk; add flour enough to roll soft. Flavor with cin- 
namon or nutmeg. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

Cream 1 cup of butter, add 2 cups of sugar, 3 eggs, 
well beaten, 1 saltspoon of nutmeg, 2 tablespoons of 
milk, flour enough to roll ; mix y> teaspoon of soda, with 
part of the flour. Roll very thin and bake on a sheet 
for 10 minutes. 

GINGER SNAPS. 
Beat y 2 cup of butter to a cream in a warm bowl, then 
add gradually y 2 cup of sugar and y 2 cup of molasses, y 2 
tablespoon of ginger, y 2 teaspoon of soda, J4 cup of 
milk, gradually add about 3 cups of flour. Then roll 
out very thin and cut with a round cutter. 

MACAROONS. (Southern recipe.) 

To y 2 pound of sweet almonds and J4 pound of bitter 
almonds, pounded to a powder, add 24 of a pound of 
loaf sugar, rolled fine. Beat the whites of 3 eggs very 
stiff and add a little rose water, and mix with the 
almonds. When the mixture is soft enough to shape, 
drop by spoonfuls on tin sheets, lined with paper, and 
bake in a slow oven. 

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CARAMEL FROSTING. 

Boil i cup of sugar, l /± cup of milk, y 2 square chocolate 
until they thread ; then add y 2 teaspoon vanilla. 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 

Beat the whites of 2 eggs stiff and dry; add \ l / 2 cups 
of sugar, 2 teaspoons of vanilla and 5 tablespoons of 
grated and melted chocolate. Spread between layers and 
on the top and sides of cake. 

FROSTING. 
One-half cup granulated sugar and l /> cup of cold 
water. Boil together until it threads. Pour immediately 
on beaten white of 1 (igg, beating until stiff enough to 
remain on cake. Flavor with ]/ 2 teaspoon of vanilla. 

BROWN FROSTING. 

Boil 1 cup of brown sugar, 1-3 cup of water, till it 
threads ; pour this on the beaten white of I egg and beat 
till of the right consistency to spread. 

BOILED FROSTING. 

Boil 1 cup granulated sugar with y 2 cup of water, 
without stirring, till it ropes, when dropped from a fork 
or spoon. Pour gradually over the stiffly beaten whites 
of 2 eggs, beating hard. Flavor. When it thickens and 
is perfectly smooth, pour over the cake. 

PLAIN ICING. 
Beat the white of 1 egg stiff, add 1 cup of powdered 
sugar and beat very hard for 10 minutes; add 1 teaspoon 

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lemon juice, if white icing be desired; orange, if for 
yellow icing. Spread on cake while warm, with a broad 
bladed knife, dipped in cold water. Set in a warm place 
to dry. In frosting cakes, dip into the icing. 

CHOCOLATE ICING. 

Whites of 2 eggs, I cup of powdered sugar, 6 table- 
spoons grated chocolate and I teaspoon vanilla. Put the 
sugar with 2 tablespoons of hot water and chocolate in 
a saucepan and stir until smooth and glossy ; beat the 
whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, then add the sugar 
and chocolate. If eggs are very large, use y 2 cup more 
of sugar. 

CARAMEL ICING. 

Put 1 cupful of brown sugar into a saucepan and cook 
over a hot fire until the sugar is well burned. Then pour 
over it 1 cupful of water and let it cook until the sugar 
threads. Have ready the well-beaten whites of 2 eggs 
and pour the burnt sugar slowly over them and beat 
rapidly until the icing is frothy and thick ; add 1 teaspoon 
of flavoring and a tablespoon of sherry. When the mix- 
ture is very light spread it smoothly on top and sides of 
cake. 

CARAMEL FILLING FOR CAKE. 

Three cups of brown sugar, ^ CU P °f cream, 6 ounces 
of butter; boil together until it hardens when dropped 
on a plate of water. 

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CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

Chocolate filling for layer cake is made in the propor- 
tion of i egg to every 2 ounces of chocolate. Melt the 
chocolate over boiling water ; beat the white of the egg 
until stiff, then beat in gradually 2 tablespoons powdered 
sugar, beating until stiff enough to keep its shape. Beat 
in the melted chocolate. This can be used not only for 
the filling between the cakes, but is good for the icing. 

APPLE FILLING. 

Beat the white of 1 egg very stiff, add 1 cup of pow- 
dered sugar, the finely grated pulp of 1 sour apple, 1 
tablespoon of cream and a generous speck of nutmeg ; 
beat thoroughly for 5 minutes and flavor with j/ 2 tea- 
spoon of vanilla. 

MOCHA FILLING. 

Cream 2 tablespoons of butter, add 1 ctfp of powdered 
sugar, 3 rounding teaspoons of cocoa, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 
1 tablespoon of cream and 2 tablespoons of coffee. Beat 
well and spread between and on top of layer cake. 



158 



CHAPTER VII. 

Preserves and Pickling 

HINTS 

A few lumps of lime placed on the shelves of the store- 
room will keep pickles, jams, etc., from becoming mouldy. 
Renew occasionally. 

If grape or other small fruit juice fails to jelly, add a 
small quantity of apple juice and let all boil together. 

Do not gather currants or other small fruits after a 
rain, as then it is impossible to get the juice to jelly. 

Hard boiling causes jelly to crystallize. It should only 
simmer. Jellies should be covered closely and kept in a 
cool, dry, dark place. 

Loaf sugar, crushed and rolled fine, is best for pre- 
serving. 

PRESERVED QUINCES. 

Wipe, pare, quarter and remove the core and hard 
part. Weigh fruit and take an equal quantity of sugar. 
Put quinces into cold water and when all have been 
pared, drain; put into a preserving kettle, cover with 
cold water and cook over a slow fire until fruit is tender 
enough to be pierced with a fork; skim out and lay on 
a platter until all are cooked. Strain the water, add 
sugar and cook gently for 10 minutes, skimming until 

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clear; then put in as many quinces as the syrup will cover. 
Simmer until the fruit turns a rich red. Lift out with a 
spoon, drop piece by piece into hot glass jars. Let the 
syrup cook a little longer or until very thick; pour over 
the quinces, filling almost to the top ; add I teaspoon 
of brandy, seal and keep in a cool, dry place. 

PRESERVED CRAB APPLE. 

Pare fine ripe apples and throw at once into cold 
water. Put the parings in the preserving kettle and cover 
with cold water and simmer about i hour. Strain off 
the water and put it back in the kettle. Add as many 
pounds of sugar as you have pounds of fruit, and cook 
until syrup is quite thick. Drop in a few apples at a 
time and cook until tender enough to be pierced with a 
fork. Lift out carefully and drop into glass bottles. 
Cook the syrup a little longer, pour over the apples and 
add i teaspoon of brandy and seal. Peaches may be done 
in the same way by cutting in halves and cooking the 
kernels with the parings. 

QUINCE MARMALADE. 

Take as many quinces as you may wish. Rub, pare, 
core and boil in a little water until soft ; put the cores and 
skins on to boil separately, in water enough to cover ; 
when soft strain liquor into the boiling quince mixture 
and rub through a sieve. Put on to cook again (stirring 
almost constantly) for y 2 hour, adding $4 as much sugar 

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as fruit, measured after paring. When smooth and firm, 
put in jars, seal air-tight and keep in dry, cool place. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Take 3 large seedless oranges and 2 large lemons (re- 
jecting seeds from lemons) and put into a meat chopper, 
and grind all together. Add 11 jelly tumblers of cold 
water ; let it stand 24 hours, then boil uncovered 1 hour. 
Remove from stove, add 4 pounds of granulated sugar 
and let stand another 24 hours. Then boil steadily for 
1 ]/ 2 hours. This quantity will fill about a dozen glasses. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

Currants should be quite ripe, but not owr-ripe. Pick 
over, wash, stem and put into a preserving kettle set on 
back of range until juice flows freely; mash with a 
wooden vegetable masher and strain through a coarse 
strainer. Turn the juice into a flannel bag and let drip 
into a vessel beneath, all night. In the morning measure 
juice and allow an equal amount of sugar. Put the juice 
into a preserving kettle and let it boil about 20 minutes 
(skim if necessary) ; add the sugar and cook until it 
thickens on a plate when exposed to the air. Turn at 
once into hot glasses, add y 2 teaspoon brandy and cover 
with paper pasted over the top. Keep in a cool, dry, 
dark place. 

WILD GRAPE JELLY. 

Select the grapes when not fully ripe. Wash and 

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drain and make same as Currant Jelly. Ripe grapes 
with a handful of green ones gives a most delicately 
colored and flavored jelly. 

ELDERBERRY JELLY. 

Make same as currant jelly. Do not use for 2 or 3 
months, so it will thicken, it being more like a syrup at 
first. This is excellent for throat trouble. 

CRAB APPLE OR PORTER APPLE JELLY. 

Wash apples, remove stem and blossom ends, and cut 
into quarters (do not pare nor remove seeds). Put 
into a preserving kettle and cover with cold water and 
boil until soft; then put them into a coarse sieve and 
press out all the juice ; strain again through a flannel bag. 
Do not squeeze it, as that makes the jelly cloudy. Meas- 
ure the juice and allow i l / 2 pints of sugar to 1 quart of 
juice, and boil down just one-half ; then skim, and turn 
into glasses and add 1 teaspoon of brandy. Cover and 
keep in a cool, dry place. One part quince and four parts 
apple make a most delicious jelly ; in that case, use equal 
parts of juice and sugar. 

QUINCE JELLY. 

Follow directions for Apple Jelly, using quinces in 
place of apples. 

SPICED APPLES. 

A russet is generally chosen for this dish. Remove 
the core, but do not pare it. Stick 2 cloves in each apple. 

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Make a syrup in the proportion of 4 pounds of sugar to 
1 quart of vinegar ; add the apples whole and cook until 
soft enough to be pierced with a straw. Then add 2 
ounces of cassia bud and 1 ounce of whole mace. Put 2 
ounces of ginger root, scraped and sliced, in the vinegar 
and sugar before you begin to cook the apples. This 
will take 7 or 8 pounds of fruit. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

Three pounds of white sugar, 5 pounds of ripe cur- 
rants, 1 tablespoon each of cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and 
allspice. Boil currants 1 hour, then add the sugar, spices 
and y 2 pint of vinegar ; boil y 2 hour longer. 

SPICED CURRANTS. (No. 2.) 
Fruit that is very ripe or soft makes excellent jam. 
Boil 7 pounds fruit y 2 hour or until very soft and well 
cooked; mash with a wooden spoon, then add 5 pounds 
sugar and return to the fire and boil slowly 1 hour longer, 
stirring often to prevent burning. When jam is done, 
add 1 pint of sharp cider vinegar, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, 
1 teaspoon ginger and y 2 teaspoon cayenne pepper. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Twenty-five large ripe tomatoes, 12 onions, 6 green 
peppers, 1 head of celery, chopped fine ; add 3 quarts of 
vinegar, i l / 2 cups sugar, 1 tablespoon each of allspice, 
clove, cinnamon and mace; 1 tablespoon of salt. Boil 
slowly 2 l / 2 hours. 

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TOMATO KETCHUP. 
Wash and peel 12 ripe tomatoes, chop 3 green peppers 
very fine, and 1 large onion, add 1 tablespoon of salt, 1 
tablespoon of brown sugar, 1 teaspoon each of allspice, 
cloves, nutmeg, ginger ; the spices to be tied in a bag ; 2 
cups of vinegar. Boil 4 hours and strain. 

TOMATO KETCHUP. (No. 2.) 
Add to 12 quarts of tomato, (measured after 
straining), 12 tablespoons of salt, y. of a pound whole 
mustard seed, 2 ounces of allspice, y 2 ounce of whole 
cloves and y 2 ounce of cayenne pepper. Boil slowly 4 
hours ; sweeten to taste. Strain again, then add 1 cup of 
vinegar. Do not boil again. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

One gallon of tomatoes, 4 tablespoons of salt, 4 table- 
spoons of black pepper, 3 tablespoons of mustard, 2 
tablespoons of ground cloves, 1 tablespoon of allspice, 2 
green peppers, 1 pint of sharp vinegar. Simmer 4 hours 
and strain through a coarse strainer, add y 2 pint of 
brandy and % pound of sugar. Bottle it and add a bit 
of mace or 3 whole cloves to each bottle and let it stand 
over night uncovered. 

CHOW CHOW. 

One peck of green tomatoes, 6 small onions, 6 green 
peppers, 1 head celery, y 2 cup of horse radish, 1 teaspoon 
cinnamon, % of an ounce of cloves, 1 nutmeg. Chop the 

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tomatoes and cover with I cup of salt; let stand over 
night; in the morning, drain off every drop. Add the 
other ingredients chopped. Scald 2 quarts of vinegar 
in 1 pint of sugar aand pour oyer the whole. Put it on 
the fire and boil 15 minutes, stirring all the time; then 
place it where it will simmer until the tomatoes are soft 
and thick. Turn into jars, cover closely and keep in a 
dry, cool place. 

GREEN TOMATOES PICKLED. 

Slice 1 peck of green tomatoes ; add 1 teacup of salt ; 
let stand all night. In the morning drain off the salt. 
Add 6 small onions and 4 green peppers, cut fine, ]/ 2 pint 
of white mustard seed, Yz ounce of ground cloves, >4 
ounce of allspice, y 2 teaspoon of cayenne pepper. Cover 
the whole with vinegar and simmer till tender. Do not 
put spice and mustard seed in until it is cool. 



165 



CHAPTER VIII. 

Cooking for Invalids 

HINTS. 

Food for sick people should be served either hot or 
cold; never lukewarm. 

TOAST WATER. 
Take thin slices of white bread and toast it very brown 
on both sides, being careful not to burn it. Put the toast 
into a pitcher and pour over it boiling water from a tea- 
kettle, using as much water as is needed for a drink. 
Strain when needed and serve. 

EGG NOGG. 

Beat the yolk of I egg, very light, add pinch of salt, 2 
tablespoons sugar and 1 or 2 tablespoons of brandy. 
Strain into a tumbler and fill with milk and the beaten 
white, and mix until frothy. 

WINE CUSTARD (for a convalescent). 
Put on to boil 1 pint of white wine, add sugar to taste, 
a small piece of stick cinnamon, or the rind of I lemon. 
Let it boil and then pour over the beaten yolks of 7 eggs, 
stirring all the while. Set cups in pan of boiling water, 
strain custard into them and cook like other custards. 

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PEACH CREAM. 

Take 4 large white peaches, which are soft and ripe. 
Peel and cut them into a bowl, add 1 cup of powdered 
sugar and the white of 1 egg, and beat them with a fork 
for fully 20 minutes. This makes a delicious smooth 
cream, and is especially nice for a convalescent. 

RICE WATER. 

Put 2 tablespoons of clean washed rice into 2 quarts of 
boiling water, and let it simmer for 2 hours, until the 
rice is thoroughly cooked. Strain through a fine strainer 
and flavor with a good pinch of salt. Serve hot or cold. 
If stimulants are prescribed, 2 tablespoons of sherry may 
be added, and makes it very palatable. 

MUTTON BROTH. 

Wipe meat with a damp cloth ; remove all the fat and 
cut meat into small pieces. Allow 1 pint of cold water 
to each pound of meat and bones ; put into a kettle with 
the cold water and let stand for half an hour ; add % CU P 
of washed rice or barley and let it cook slowly for 3 or 4 
hours ; remove bones and meat ; season to taste with salt, 
pepper, celery salt and nutmeg. Strain and serve hot. 

CLAM BROTH. 

Wash thoroughly and lay a dozen large clams in 
their shells in a saucepan with y^ cup of cold water. Let 
the water come to a boil ; when the clams open, the broth 
is done. Strain it and add salt if necessary. 

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OYSTER BROTH. 

Chop 8 large fresh oysters fine and cover them with 
a cup of cold water. Let it come slowly to the boiling 
point and then keep it gently simmering for just 5 min- 
utes. Strain into a hot cup and serve very hot with 
toast. If desired, y 2 cup of milk may be added to the 
strained liquor and then returned to the fire, until it 
comes to a boil. Season with salt and pepper and mace. 

TAMARIND WATER. (Southern recipe.) 
Pour 1 pint of boiling water on 1 tablespoon of pre- 
served tamarinds. Put in a little white sugar, mix thor- 
oughly, let it stand for 15 or 20 minutes, strain and 
serve. Very pleasant and cooling in fevers. 

CAMOMILE FLOWERS TEA. (Southern recipe.) 
Steep a handful of the flowers in a pint of boiling 

water, let it cool and give a wineglass every 3 hours. 

Good for weakness after illness ; also a tonic. 

WINE WHEY. (Southern recipe.) 
Take 1 cup of hot milk, add 1 wineglass of hot water 
and a little white sugar to taste ; then put in 1 wineglass 
of madeira or sherry wine, strain it and drink the whey 
hot, without the curd. 

WINE WHEY. (No. 2.) 

Boil 1 cupful of milk and add ^2 cupful of wine. Let 
stand until the curd has separated from the whey. Strain 
through a very fine strainer. Sweeten to taste and serve 
either hot or cold 

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COCOA CORDIAL 

Put into a cup ^ teaspoon of cocoa, add 2 lumps of 
sugar, 2-3 cup of boiling water and 2 tablespoons of 
Port wine. Mix well and serve without further cook- 
ing. This is good in cases of exhaustion or a chill. 

IRISH MOSS JELLY. 

One-half cup of Irish moss, i*/2 cups of boiling water, 
2 cups of milk, a pinch of salt. Wash the moss till 
soft and free from sand. Put it with the boiling water 
and salt into the top of the double boiler and cook until 
thick as cream. Strain into the milk, which has been 
scalded. Flavor with y 2 teaspoon vanilla, and pour into 
small cups, previously wet with cold water. Set away to 
harden and serve with cream and sugar. 
BEEF TEA. 

Chop 1 pound of lean beef very fine. Put into a clean 
bottle, with a little salt, 1 or 2 fresh celery leaves and a 
sprig of parsley. Pour in a pint of cold water and cork 
the bottle tightly. Place it upon a trivit, in a pot partly 
filled with cold water and let heat very slowly for 3 or 4 
hours ; cook until the liquid turns a reddish brown. Strain 
and serve hot. If any particles of fat are present, it may 
be removed by putting in pieces of thin brown paper, to 
absorb it. 

BROILED BEEF JUICE. 

Get a piece of lean beef, cut an inch thick, and broil it 
over red hot coals; turn often to prevent the juices from 

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New England Cook Book 



escaping and allow 2 minutes to each side. Cut into 
small pieces and squeeze the juice through a lemon 
squeezer into a heated cup; add a pinch of salt and a 
shake of pepper. Serve at once. 

COCOA. 

Moisten 2 teaspoons of Phillips Cocoa with an equal 
amount of cold water and let it stand one minute. Add 
1/2 cup of boiling water and boil for a few minutes ; then 
add 1 cup of hot milk. 

INDIAN MEAL GRUEL. 

Mix 6 tablespoons of sifted Indian meal with 6 table- 
spoons of cold water until smooth and free from lumps. 
Put into a saucepan with 1 pint of boiling water and boil 
for 15 or 20 minutes, stirring to prevent burning; then 
place it where it will cook slowly for 2 or 3 hours. 
Add milk, enough to make it of the right consistency, a 
pinch of salt, nutmeg and a little sugar. One tablespoon 
of wine may be added if liked. Strain through a coarse 
strainer and serve. One teaspoon of butter improves it 
if it is allowed. 

EGG GRUEL. 

Beat the yolk of 1 egg very light, add 1 teaspoon sugar, 
a pinch of salt, 1 cup of hot milk and the white beaten 
stiff. Flavor with nutmeg. This is excellent for a heavy 
cold if taken very hot after retiring. 

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OATMEAL GRUEL. (Irish recipe.) 
One cup of Irish oatmeal, 4 cups cold water, 1 table- 
spoon of chopped raisins, y 2 teaspoon salt. Pick over 
the cereal and remove any black specks. Put in the upper 
part of double boiler and cook directly over the fire until 
it boils; then place it over the lower part and cook for 
7 or 8 hours, thinning with boiling water; add about 1 
cup of milk or cream, and a little sugar and nutmeg. 
Serve very hot. Strain if wished. This is very good for 
a heavy cold. 

OATMEAL GRUEL. (No. 2.) 

One-half cup of Irish oatmeal, 2 cups of cold water, 
x /z teaspoon salt. Roll the meal until floury, add ^4 of 
the water, stir well and let stand a few minutes; then 
pour the milky looking water into a saucepan ; continue 
adding a little of the water to the meal, until all has been 
used. Boil y 2 hour, stirring to prevent burning. Add 
milk to make of proper consistency, and sugar. Strain. 

IMPERIAL GRANUM GRUEL. 

Take 4 teaspoons of granum, moisten with enough cold 
water to make a thin paste. Add 1 cup of hot water 
and a shake of salt and boil for 10 minutes. Add I cup 
of cold milk; let it come to the boiling point and serve. 
If you wish, a very little sugar may be added. This is 
very good served after surgical operations. 

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ELDERBERRY WINE. 

Put the elderberries in a saucepan, with enough water 
to keep from burning, and simmer until the juice flows 
freely ; cool and strain. Boil 3 quarts of water, 4 pounds 
of sugar and y 2 pound of raisins together for y? hour ; 
strain, and when cool add 1 quart of the elderberry juice. 
Let it stand for 24 hours, and skim well. Drop in a 
piece of toast, about y inch square, spread with yeast 
and leave to ferment (about 3 weeks). When fermenta- 
tion has ceased, strain into a cask and close it tightly for 
2 months. To each gallon of liquid allow y> cup of 
brandy, rum or alcohol, and bottle. It will be fit to use 
after 6 months. If liked, to every 4 gallons of liquid 
add 1 ounce each of cloves, cinnamon, allspice and y 
ounce each of nutmeg and mace before bottling. Keep 
in a cool place. 

CLARET PUNCH. (Southern recipe.) 

Use 1-3 as much water as claret, put on to boil with 
a lemon peel, a few cloves, a piece of stick cinnamon and 
some loaf sugar to taste ; when boiling add the claret, 
strain and serve. 



172 



CORRECT SAUCES FOR MEATS AND FISH. 

Roast duck — orange sauce or orange salad. 

Roast turkey — chestnut dressing — cranberry sauce. 

Roast goose — tart apple sauce. 

Roast canvas back duck — blackberry jelly. 

Roast chicken — bread sauce. 

Roast beef — horseradish sauce. 

Roast veal — horseradish or tomato sauce. 

Roast mutton — currant jelly. 

Roast lamb — mint sauce. 

Roast pork — apple sauce. 

Corned beef — made mustard. 

Cold boiled tongue — sauce tartare. 

Fried chicken — cream gravy. 

Fresh salmon — white or hollandaise sauce. 

Broiled mackerel — Maitre d'Hotel butter. 

Lobster cutlets — sauce tartare. 

Fried fish — cole slaw. 



173 



INDEX 



Apples, baked 123, 

Compote, 124 
Ginger, 123 
Stewed, 123 
Spiced, 162 
Artichokes, 87 
Asparagus, 88 
Bacon, No. 2, 41 
Beans, 

Shelled, 90 
String, 84 
Beef, corned, 51 
Frizzled, 41 
Gravy, 47 
Pot-roast, 54 
Roast, 47 
Beef, steak, broiled 45 
Stew, 45 
Steak pie, 42 
Sandwiches, 49 
Tea, 169 

Juice, broiled, 169 
Beets, 84 

Bisque, of lobster, 29 
Biscuit, baking powder, 17 

Raised, 10 
Bouillon, 28 
Bread, Boston brown 15 
Milk, 7 
Water, 8 
Steamed, 13 
Graham, 47 
Broth, mutton, 167 



Scotch, 37 

Oyster, 167 

Clam, 167 
Buckwheat cakes, 25 
Cake, angel, 145 

Dutch apple 150 
Cream, 138 

Cream, (No. 2) 118 
(No. 3) 139 
Chocolate, 144 & 145 
Cup, 146 
Composition, 150 
Dayton, 147 
Delicate, 149 
Drop, 142 
Feather, 149 
Fruit, 148 
Gold, 142 

Lady Baltimore, 143 
Neopolitan, 147 
Nut, 144 
Orange, 143 
Pound, 140 
(No. 2) 140 
Pork, 149 
Silver, 147 

Sponge, 139 & 140 " 
Strawberry, 146 
Spanish, 146 
Spice, 146 
Lightning, 140 
Robert E. Lee, 145 
Queen, 144 



174 



Index 



Currants, spiced 163 
Celery, 89 
Cauliflower, 87 
Custard, baked 106 
Boiled 106 
Caramel 106 
Strawberry 119 
Wine 166 
Crullers, 153 
Cookies, 154 

Sugar: (No. 2) 155 
Croquettes, beef 71 

Chicken 71 

(No. 2) 71 
Hominy 70 
Lobster 72 
Meat 72 
Oyster 69 
Potato 70 
Rice 69 
Salmon 69 
Fish 68 
Veal 70 
Corn meal puffs 12 
Corn bread (No. 2) 17 

Cake, Never fail 19 
Oatmeal 20 
Cranberry Jelly, 121 

(No. 2) 122 
Carrots, 84 
Cream filling, 138 
Cakes, corn, 17 

Sour milk corn, 16 
Southern " 20 
Spider " 19 
R. I. Johnny, 13 
Melissa's, 16 
Hoe, 20 



Cakes, Hominy; 18 
Puffs, 18 
Dough, 9 
Chocolate, 26 - 
Caramels, 129 
Cream, 128 
Candy, creamed walnuts, 128 
Butter Scotch, 129 
Old fashioned moasses, 127 
Taffy, 127 
Peanut, 127 
Fudge, 127 
Chow-Chow, 164 
Chowder, Belmont, 38 
Corn, 37 
Clam, 38 
Salt codfish, 39 
Cabbage, creamed, 92 
Scalloped, 90 
Boiled, 86 
Corn, 89 
Cocoa, 27-170 
Cordial, 169 
Coffee, filtered, 87 
Coffee, 26 

made over night, 27 
Charlotte Russe, 117 
Cieme au Cafe, 116 
Chamomile tea, 168 
Chicken, roast, 51 

Fricassee, 49 
Clams, a la creme, 56 
Doughnuts, 151 

Raised 152 
Sour milk 152 
Dough, stick 8 
Dumplings for stew, 44 



175 



Index 



Duck, roast 50 
Boiled 50 
Dressing, Mayonnaise 94 

(No. 2) 94 
Dressing, boiled (No. 2) 95 
French 93 
Tomato salad 98 
Eggs, Boiled soft 76 
Fried; 76 
Scrambled 77 
Stuffed 77 

(No. 2) 78 
Poached 77 
Cupped 77 
Vermicelli 79 
Eggnog, 166 
Egg Plant, stuffed 83 
87 
Fritter, batter, 72 
Apple, 73 
Banana, 73 
Corn, 74 
Clam, 73 
Fruit, 73 
Oyster, 74 
Fish, baked, 55 
Broiled, 61 

Smelts, 61 
Broiled finnan haddie., 62 
Boiled salmon, 60 
Codfish balls, 59 
Creamed, 57 

Finnan haddie, 
Escalloped, 60 
Fried, 61 
Flaked, 59 
A la poulette, 56 
Halibut a la Creole, 56 
Scalloped salmon, 59 



Fish, Halibut au gratin, 57 

Toast, 58 
Fruit trifle, 115 
Frosting 156 

Boiled 156 
Brown, 156 
Caramel, 156 
Chocolate, 156 
Filling, caramel, 157 

Cream, 138 & 139 
Chocolate, 138 
Apple 158 
Mocha 158 
Griddle Cakes, 21 

Pan cakes (No. 2) 24 
Bread 22 

(No. 2,) 21 
Indian meal 22 
Graham 22 
Rice or hominy 22 
Sour milk 22 
Sweet pancakes 24 
Buckwheat 25 
(No. 2 25 
pan 24 
(No. 2) 24 
Pumpkin 23 
Oatmeal 23 
Gems Breakfast 13 
Graham 14 
Gingerbread 150 

Soft 151 
60 Hot water 151 

Ginger snaps 155 
Gruel, egg 170 

Imperial granum 111 
Indian meal 170 
Oatmeal 171 

No. 2 171 

176 



Index 



Hermits 153 
Ham, boiled 49 
Broiled 49 
Fried 42 
Hamburg steak 53 
How to add yolks of eggs to soups 

and sauces 62 
Ice Cream, coffee, 118 
French, 118 
Philadelphia, 118 
Raspberry, 117 
Icing, 156 

Caramel 157 
Chocolate, 157 
Ice Cream 117 
Irish Stew 43 
Jelly, 169 

Currant 161 
Wild grape 161 
Elderberry 162 
Crab apple 162 
Quince 162 
Irish moss 169 
Cider, 120 
Coffee, 119 
Lemon, 119 
Orange, 119 
Wine, 119 

No. 2, 120 
No. 3, 120 
Fruit, 121 
Lobster Newburgh, 62 
Lettuce, 93 
Macaroni, 92 

No. 2, 93 
Mutton, or lamb chops broiled 43 
Boiled 43 
Chops en papier 52 



Mutton, Curry of 40 

Haricot of 42 
Mock lamb chops 51 
Meat, casserole of 45 
Muffins, 14 

(No. 2) 11 

Corn 18 

Fried rye 11 

Graham 10 

Meal 12 

Rice 10 

Raised Sally Lunns 18 
.i 12 

Milk toast, 16 

Meat 52 
Mince meat 135 
Meringues 121 
Macaroons 155 
Omelet, orange 75 
Plain 75 
Rich 75 
Onions, boiled 85 
Baked 86 
Stuffed 91 
Oysters, broiled 61 
Oxtail, braised 53 
Old fashioned Johnny cakes 13 
Oyster plant 89 
Pastry, for one pie 121 

Plain 130 
Prunes, stewed 124 
Pie, apple 133 

Colonial pumpkin 131 

Custard 132 

Lemon 132 

Dried apple or peach 133 

Mock cherry 131 

Mince 131 



177 



Index 



Pie, Bristol 133 

No. 2, 132 
3, 135 
Huckleberry or blueberry 133 
Rhubarb 134 
Bristol 133 
Elderberry 134 
Pottage, peasant's 44 
Parsnip's creamed 92 
Peas, green, boiled 88 
Pumpkin, boiled 89 
Peppers, stuffed 85 
Preserves, quince 159 

Marmalade 160 
Crab apple 160 
Orange marmalade 161 
Punch, claret 172 
Pop-overs 14 
Pork and beans, baked 54 
Pork chops, 46 
Pork, roast 46 
Poultry, gravy 47 
Roast, 51 
Pot roast of beef, 54 
Peach cream 167 
Potato, baked 82 
Boiled 82 
Creamed 81 
En surprise 80 
Franconia 82 
Fried 80 

Hashed brown 80 
Lyonnaise 82 
Souffle 83 
A la maitre 81 
Mashed 81 
D' hotel 81 
Pudding, Bread 104 



Pudding, Blueberry 110 

Brown Betty 108 

Chocolate 105 

Chocolate Custard 107 

Cottage 105 

Cracker 111 

Chocolate Blanc Mange, 
111 

Cabinet 115 

Cornstarch 107 

Cocanutll2 

Cranberry 113 

English Plum 114 

Floating Island 110 

Harriet 108 

Indian Meal 109 

(No. 2) 109 

Jellied Peaches 104 

Lemon 105 

New England plum 113 

Poor mans 112 

Peach charlotte 116 

Plain rice 112 

Peaches and gelatine 116 

Rice and strawberry 115 

Surprise 103 

Suet 113 

Snow 105 

Steamed apple 103 

Blueberry 104 

Fruit 104 

Snow Cream 110 

Tapioca 108 

White Mountain 110 

Yorkshire 47 
Rice, boiled 90 
Steamed 93 
Water 167 
Rusk 8 



I 7 8 



Index 



Rolls, Parker House 9 
Soup, black bean 23 

Celery 35 

Crecy 33 

Cream of chestnuts 30 
Soup Virginia 29 
Turnip 34 
Lobster Bisque 29 

Mock " 36 

Okra 34 

Oyster 35 

Onion 34 

Potato 31 

Potato (No. 2) 31 

Salmon 35 

Split pea 36 

Stock 28 

St. Germaine 30 

Tomato 32 

No. 2, 32 

Tomato clam 32 
Sick room cookery 166 
Sand tarts 154 
Sauce, apple, 122 

Apple (No. 2) 123 

Rhubarb 122 

White 65 

Velvet 66 

Bechemel, 66 

Caper, 66 

Chili, 163 

Creole, 63 

(No. 2) 03 

Cream, thick, 66 
Rich, 57 

Curry, 65 

Claret, 126 

Creamy, 126 



S?uce, Cider, 67 

Drawn butter 66 

Egg 65 

Foamy 126 

Hard 126 

No. 2 126 

Horse radish 64 

Hollandaise 68 

Lemon 125 

Maitre d'hotel 63 

Maitre d'hotel butter 68 

Mint 64 

Molasses 126 

Olive 67 

Onion 65 

Onion, for beef 68 

Pudding 127 

Rum 125 

Tartare 67 

Tomato 64 

Wine for plum pudding 124 

Wine 125 

Shortcake, strawberry 142 
Salad 

Fruit 97 

Celery and chicken in 
tomato cups 96 

Spring 97 

Potato 101 

(No. 2) 101 
(No. 3) 101 

Apple and nut 100 

Beet 95 

Celery 95 

Chicken 99 

Club 100 

Cole shaw 96 

Dandelion 95 



179 



Index 



Duck 96 

Fruit 97 

Lettuce 97 

Lobster 99 

Mock chicken 99 

Potato and watercress 95 

Shrimp 98 

No. 2, 98 
No. 3,99 
Salmon 97 

Tomato with dressing 98 
Stuffing 48 

Chestnut 48 
Sherbet, Pineapple 118 
Squash 85 

Baked 84 
Spinach 87 

(No. 2) 88 
Sandwiches, Egg 78 
Ham 79 
Roast beef 79 
Tomato, baked in pan 91 
Ketchup 164 



Tomato, Stewed 83 
Scalloped 90 
Stuffed 89 
Fried 91 
Turnips, Creamed 86 
Mashed 84 
Tamarind, water 168 
To brown flour 6 
Tomatoes, green pickled 165 
Toast, water 166 
German 15 
Milk 16 
Tea 25 

Russian 26 
Veal smothered 48 
Waffles, 14 

Rice 15 
Welsh Rarebit 101 
Wine Whey 168 

No. 2, 168 
Wine elderberry, 172 
Wafers, nut 153 



180 



NOV 111909 



NOV III '309 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




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